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1985 Winners & Finalists

October 18 | hosted by Vicki Gabereau

 

Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize

Winner! Intertidal Life
by Audrey Thomas
Publisher: Stoddart Publishing

Intertidal Life

Intertidal Life is set on the West Coast of Canada and shows Thomas’s usual concern with language and metaphor and the uneasy relationships between men and women, women and women, and women and children. As usual, there are no answers, only questions. Nor are there heroes or heroines, only brave survivors. Audrey Thomas lives and works on Galiano Island. Intertidal Life was nominated for a Governor General’s Award.

A Coastal Range
by Charles Lillard
Publisher: Sono Nis Press

A Coastal Range

A Coastal Range represents one of Charles Lillard’s most stunning pieces of work to date. Its four sections – Jenny, The Sea in the Forest, Jabble, and The Outside West – capture different themes and features of Lillard’s poetry in remarkable style. Charles Lillard was one of B.C.’s most knowledgeable bibliophiles and prolific authors. He passed away in 1997. A Coastal Range was nominated for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize prior to the establishment of the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize in 1986.

Winners
by Mary-Ellen Lang Collura
Publisher: Western Producer Prairie Books

Winners

Fifteen-year-old Jordy Threebears is returning to the Ash Creek Reserve to live with a grandfather he hardly knows after years of shuffling around foster homes. For Jordy, the years of resentment and anger prove difficult to overcome until he receives the gift of a wild mare. With his horse Siksika, Jordy gains a companion as well as the determination to beat the odds. But Fred Brady’s unexplainable hatred of Jordy threatens the boy’s chance for happiness. This dramatic story of a boy struggling for his identity in a world that has brought only bitterness and despair ensures a memorable reading experience. Mary-Ellen Lang Collura is an English teacher in Parksville, BC. More

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Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize

Winner! Duff: A Life in the Law
by David Ricardo Williams
Publisher: UBC Press

Duff: A Life in the Law

Sir Lyman Poore Duff spent forty years in high judicial office, the last eleven of them as Canada’s Chief Justice. This is the premier biography of one of Canada’s most distinguished jurists. As a lawyer he served in Canada’s counsel for the Alaska boundary dispute and, while on the bench of the Supreme Court, he gave Canada a final court of appeal. A man of contradictions – sober of mind but so prone to drink that he nearly lost his seat because of it – Duff is a fascinating character to which Duff: A Life in Law gives a full-colour picture. David Ricardo Williams is the author of multiple books on British Columbian and Canadian history.

Vancouver The Way It Was
by Michael Kluckner
Publisher: Whitecap Books

Vancouver The Way It Was

Vancouver The Way It Was is an exploration of the vanishing aspects of a city that gave way to new development and new sensibilities. Michael Kluckner is an artist and writer who has produced multiple books concerned with heritage and structure. He currently lives in Australia.

Without Surrender, Without Consent
by Daniel Raunet
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Without Surrender, Without Consent

Never invaded by armies and never ceded by formal treaty, the territory of the Nisga’a Nation has long been embroiled in a critical land claims dispute. This book offers an authoritative chronicle of the Nisga’a fight for justice and self-determination. From firsthand accounts of life before contact with European traders, to 1973, when the Supreme Court of Canada failed to rule decisively on the Nisga’a land title, yet acknowledged that their aboriginal claim had never been extinguished, this is a compelling and carefully researched analysis of Nisga’a-White relations.

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Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize

Winner! Cedar
by Hilary Stewart
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Cedar

From the mighty cedar of the rainforest came a wealth of raw materials vital to the early Northwest Coast Indian way of life, its art and culture. For all its gifts, the Northwest Coast peoples held the cedar and its spirit in high regard, believing deeply in its healing and spiritual powers. Respectfully, they addressed the cedar as Long Life Maker, Life Giver and Healing Woman. Anecdotes, oral history and the accounts of early explorers, traders and missionaries highlight the text. Stewart’s 550 drawings and a selection of 50 photographs depict how the people made and used the finished products of the incomparable tree of life to the Northwest Coast Indians—the cedar. Hilary Stewart lives on Quadra Island, BC. More

Gunboat Frontier
by Barry Gough
Publisher: UBC Press

Gunboat Frontier

Gunboat Frontier presents a different interpretation of Indian-White relations in nineteenth-century British Columbia, focusing on the interaction of West Coast Indians with British law and authority. Barry Gough presents new historical evidence provided by the Admiralty Papers, an important source of information about nineteenth-century Northwest Coast Indian life. Drawing on these and other archival and governmental records, he chronicles encounters between the Royal Navy and the Indians over missions, piracies, Native slavery, liquor trafficking and crimes against persons and property, leading to the final cases of “gunboat diplomacy” used against local Indians in the late 1880s. Barry Gough is a professor of history at Wilfrid Laurier University. More

Sound Heritage
by Saeko Usukawa
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Sound Heritage

Sound Heritage: Voices of British Columbia presents the firsthand stories of the people with the courage, the dreams – and the plain stubbornness – to settle the Canadian frontier when it was still wild. These people talk candidly about the tragedy and the comedy, the good times and the rough times. Their authentic voices reveal what it was really like in those early days. Beginning with the legends and true stories of the native peoples, as well as the sagas of the early missionaries, this book tells tales all the way up to the lives and times of modern settlers on the frontier. This book is a collection of stories that appeared in BC’s oral history quarterly, Sound Heritage.

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BC Booksellers' Choice Award in Honour of Bill Duthie

Winner! Islands at the Edge
by Islands Protection Society
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Islands at the Edge

One hundred kilometres off BC’s mainland coast lie the Queen Charlotte Islands, or Haida Gwaii. It is a miracle of place, and it stands on the edge of destruction as logging companies apply to the government to clearcut the land. This book contains words and images that celebrate this place; savour it for the power of its images, the information it contains and the cause it espouses, for here is a corner of the earth that must be cherished and protected. This work features a wealth of contributors including Bill Reid, Dr. J. Bristol Foster, Wayne Campell, David Denning, John Broadhead and Thom Henley. Jacques Cousteau writes the introduction.

Cedar
by Hilary Stewart
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Cedar

From the mighty cedar of the rainforest came a wealth of raw materials vital to the early Northwest Coast Indian way of life, its art and culture. For all its gifts, the Northwest Coast peoples held the cedar and its spirit in high regard, believing deeply in its healing and spiritual powers. Respectfully, they addressed the cedar as Long Life Maker, Life Giver and Healing Woman. Anecdotes, oral history and the accounts of early explorers, traders and missionaries highlight the text. Stewart’s 550 drawings and a selection of 50 photographs depict how the people made and used the finished products of the incomparable tree of life to the Northwest Coast Indians—the cedar. Hilary Stewart lives on Quadra Island, BC. More

The Roman Cookery of Apicius
by John Edwards
Publisher: Hartley & Marks

The Roman Cookery of Apicius

John Edwards translates and adapts this collection of Roman cookery recipes, usually thought to have been compiled in the late fourth or early fifth century CE. With such intriguing recipes as those for Honeyed Dormice and Garum (a sun-ripened fish pickle) this book is sure to be a delightful edition to any kitchen. Or, perhaps not.

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