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2006 Winners & Finalists

April 29 | emceed by Bill Richardson

 

Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize

Sponsored by Friesens and Transcontinental Printing
Judges: Marilyn Bowering, Terence Young and Michael Turner

Winner! Ladykiller
by Charlotte Gill
Publisher: Thomas Allen Publishers

Ladykiller

Shot through with comic irony and gentle satire, this Governor General Prize–nominated debut collection of stories looks at escape, self-sabotage, and the power of unconscious desire to reveal a strange wisdom embedded in our darkest instincts. From her tale of a couple plotting against a crying baby in the apartment below (“Hush,” a finalist for the 2003 Journey Prize), to that of an ill-fated romance between a student and her professor, Gill’s characters tend to succumb to the allure of trouble, finding it more satisfying to ruin than to create. A treeplanter by day, Gill is a graduate of the MFA program in Creative Writing at UBC. Her work has appeared in Canadian literary magazines and has been broadcast on CBC Radio. She lives in Vancouver. More

Smoke Show
by Clint Burnham
Publisher: Arsenal Pulp Press

Smoke Show

Told in “real time” and set in the mid-nineties, this debut novel is written in a jargon and petty conversational style commonly heard in the street or on public transit. In it, assorted diehards and lost souls—as seen through a hazy filter of bus fumes and cigarette smoke—drift along in a dissonant, close-to-the bone explosion of everything and nothing at the same time. As per the cover, Burnham delivers dialogue that might have been caught on tape. A Vancouver writer and teacher, his previous books include the story collection Airborne Photo and the poetry collection Buddyland. More

So It Won’t Go Away
by John Lent
Publisher: Thistledown Press

So It Won’t Go Away

Lent continues to explore the spatial viewpoints of the dysfunctional and often funny Connelly family, to whom readers were first introduced in his previous experimental fiction, Monet’s Garden. Then, as now, we hear and see Neil, Rick, and Jane dissect their own thinking, second-guess their destinies, and generally revel in and reinvent their relationships with each other as they confront their addictions, dreams, and failures. Lent lives in Vernon, where he has taught Creative Writing and Literature courses for New Okanagan College for twenty-six years. So It Won’t Go Away is his seventh book. More

Tattycoram
by Audrey Thomas
Publisher: Goose Lane Editions

Tattycoram

In mid-nineteenth-century England, Harriet Coram, abandoned as an infant at the London Foundling Hospital, becomes a maid in the home of Charles Dickens, where she is plagued by the nickname “Tattycoram,” taught to a caged raven by a nasty relative. Thirty years later, Hattie’s peace is disrupted by a woman from her past: Dickens has caricatured both of them in Little Dorrit, and Hattie must decide whether to confront the novelist who has stolen their identities. Thomas is the author of many highly acclaimed novels and has won the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize an unprecedented three times. More

The Walking Boy
by Lydia Kwa
Publisher: Key Porter Books

The Walking Boy

Set in eighth-century China during the Tang Dynasty, this novel was inspired by true historical events during the reign of the country’s only female emperor. Abandoned as a child to the care of an aging hermit monk, Baoshi carries with him a secret only his master knows: he was born both male and female. On a quest to find his master’s former lover, the walking boy journeys to Chang’an—epicentre of the Tang Dynasty, ruled by the bitter and aging Female Emperor—where he finds himself embroiled in a ghost story set amongst the elaborate rituals of the palace. Kwa was born in Singapore and moved to Canada in 1980. She lives and works in Vancouver as a writer and psychologist. Her first novel, This Place Called Absence, was published to critical acclaim.

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Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize

Sponsored by Abebooks
Judges: Jennifer Pike, Brian Fawcett and Barbara Jo May

Winner! The Short Version: An ABC Book
by Stan Persky
Publisher: New Star Books

The Short Version: An ABC Book

The alphabetized list is usually confined to dictionaries and encyclopedias. But in Persky’s version, it becomes a forum for autobiography and essay. Weaving together personal narrative and reflection, The Short Version is an intentional miscellany that adds up to a coherent self-portrait. Poet, philosopher, and former columnist for the Globe and Mail, Persky teaches Philosophy at Capilano College and is a frequent contributor to Dooneyscafe.com. He divides his time between Vancouver and Berlin. More

Dead Man in Paradise
by J. B. MacKinnon
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Dead Man in Paradise

Equal parts mystery, personal revelation, investigative journalism, and travelogue, MacKinnon’s first book traces his search for the truth about his uncle’s murder in the Dominican Republic forty years ago. This search takes him to the corners of the country that are far from the paradise seen by millions of tourists, where he meets former revolutionaries, shadowy generals who live in hiding, as well as struggling Dominicans for whom his dead uncle, a priest, is a martyr. The book won this year’s Charles Taylor Non-fiction Prize and was nominated for the Governor General’s Award. MacKinnon is a celebrated independent journalist and contributing editor to Adbusters, Explore, and Vancouver magazines. He lives in Vancouver. More

The Golden Spruce: A True Story of Myth, Madness, and Greed
by John Vaillant
Publisher: Knopf Canada

The Golden Spruce: A True Story of Myth, Madness, and Greed

This Governor General Award-winner and BC bestseller tells the true story of a man’s obsessive mission against an industrial juggernaut, the struggle of the Haida people to save their world, and the mysterious golden tree that binds them all together. The loss of the golden spruce—sacred to the Haida on whose land it had stood for over 300 years—united loggers, natives, and environmentalists in sorrow and outrage. But while heroic efforts were made to revive the tree, Grant Hadwin, the tree’s confessed killer, disappeared under suspicious circumstances. Vaillant is a Vancouver-based journalist who has written for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and National Geographic Adventure. More

Vanishing British Columbia
by Michael Kluckner
Publisher: UBC Press

Vanishing British Columbia

The old buildings and historic places of BC form a kind of “roadside memory,” a tangible link with stories of settlement, change, and abandonment that reflect the great themes of our history. More than a decade ago, Kluckner began painting these dots on his personal map of the province in a sketchbook, and once he put a few on his website, a network of correspondents emerged that led him to family letters, photo albums, and memories from a disappearing era. This bestselling book is a record of these places and the stories they tell, combining engaging and insightful historical commentary and over 160 of the author’s original paintings mixed with old postcards, architectural plans, and photos. Kluckner is an award-winning writer, artist, and heritage activist who has spent decades exploring the highways and byways of BC. He lives in Langley. More

The Windshift Line
by Rita Moir
Publisher: Greystone Books

The Windshift Line

Moir draws strength from her father’s words as she deals with a relationship with an abusive man, the challenges of living on her own in the country, and the disappointment of another thwarted romance. In turn, she offers the same strength to her father when he must confront his own illness, loss of memory, and death. Through these experiences, she faces the reality of death and encounters her windshift line—the boundary where opposing forces collide, twist, and swirl—and transforms loneliness, fear, and loss into life-affirming power and renewal. Moir is the author of Survival Gear and the award-winning Buffalo Jump. She has also written for CBC Radio, the Globe and Mail, and the Toronto Star. She lives in Winlaw.

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Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize

Sponsored by the BC Teachers’ Federation
Judges: Aislinn Hunter, Fred Wah and Colin Browne

Winner! Vancouver Walking
by Meredith Quartermain
Publisher: NeWest Press

Vancouver Walking

With descriptive poetry evoking visions of Vancouver and the history that haunts it, this collection paints sharp, simple, and often ironic impressions of the city, culminating in a train journey down the West Coast and inland over the Sierra Nevada to Utah and Colorado. Quartermain is the author of a number of books and chapbooks, and the founder of a literary website called The News, as well as the small literary press Nomados. She lives in Vancouver. More

Anarchive
by Stephen Collis
Publisher: New Star Books

Anarchive

Collis presents the story of the Spanish Civil War and the anarchist revolution that burst forth in its midst. As the revolution in language rages, Jack Spicer, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Robert Motherwell, Cervantes, Orwell, Durruti, Joe Strummer, Ramon Fernandez, and a chorus of anonymous voices propel poetry through the gate of the radical world. Collis is the author of another book of poetry, Mine (2001), as well as numerous chapbooks. A member of the Kootenay School of Writing collective, he teaches American Literature, Poetry and Creative Writing at SFU. More

Anything but the Moon
by George Sipos
Publisher: Goose Lane Editions

Anything but the Moon

In this debut collection, the tension between the humble recognition that words are inadequate and the insistent urge to capture what one sees and feels gives this collection its blend of quiet reverence and meditative urgency. In lush lyric poems about driving in his truck or listening to the sounds of a henhouse, Sipos reflects on how everyday experiences slip by, never to be fully understood or articulated. For more than twenty years, Sipos was the leading bookseller in Prince George, where he operated Mosquito Books. He currently manages the Prince George Symphony. More

Silt
by Jordan Scott
Publisher: New Star Books

Silt

Drawing on his grandfather’s journals, Silt describes the arc of Scott’s family journey from the slave camps of WWII–era Poland, via the railway construction jobs that took his grandfather west along the rail bed, to finally settling on the Fraser River. Scott is an MA student at the University of Calgary, currently working on a manuscript titled blert, which explores the poetics of stuttering. This is his first work of poetry. He lives in Coquitlam. More

Thirty-Seven Small Songs & Thirteen Silences
by Jan Zwicky
Publisher: Gaspereau Press

Thirty-Seven Small Songs & Thirteen Silences

In her sixth collection of poetry, Zwicky continues developing a definition and working examples of the word “lyric” with odes, addresses, and apostrophes to household fixtures, human emotions, shades of light, seasons, stretches of land, departures, sounds, and solitude. Zwicky is a musician, philosopher, and award-winning poet. Her collection Robinson’s Crossing was nominated for a Governor General’s Award and won the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize in 2005. She currently teaches Philosophy at the University of Victoria. More

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Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize

Sponsored by Sandhill Book Marketing with the support of an anonymous donor and the BC Branch of the Editors’ Association of Canada
Judges: Daniel Francis, Joan Givner and Richard Hopkins

Winner! The Golden Spruce: A True Story of Myth, Madness, and Greed
by John Vaillant
Publisher: Knopf Canada

The Golden Spruce: A True Story of Myth, Madness, and Greed

This Governor General Award-winner and BC bestseller tells the true story of a man’s obsessive mission against an industrial juggernaut, the struggle of the Haida people to save their world, and the mysterious golden tree that binds them all together. The loss of the golden spruce—sacred to the Haida on whose land it had stood for over 300 years—united loggers, natives, and environmentalists in sorrow and outrage. But while heroic efforts were made to revive the tree, Grant Hadwin, the tree’s confessed killer, disappeared under suspicious circumstances. Vaillant is a Vancouver-based journalist who has written for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and National Geographic Adventure. More

Dream City: Vancouver and the Global Imagination
by Lance Berelowitz
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Dream City: Vancouver and the Global Imagination

Located at the edge of a continent and at the corresponding edge of national public consciousness, Vancouver has emerged as an experiment in contemporary city-making, with international interest in the city as a model of postindustrial urbanism. In this winner of the City of Vancouver Book Award, Berelowitz explores the links between Vancouver’s seductive natural setting, turbulent political history, and changing civic values and its planning and design culture. A well-known commentator and award-winning writer, Berelowitz was the editor-in-chief of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games Bid Book.  More

Islands in the Salish Sea: A Community Atlas
by Sheila Harrington, Judith Stevenson, and Kathy Dunster
Publisher: TouchWood Editions

Islands in the Salish Sea: A Community Atlas

Created by community groups, sponsored by the Land Trust Alliance of British Columbia, and supported by funding agencies and individual donors, this unconventional map collection shows places on the Gulf Islands that are most beloved by their residents, from heritage orchards, fishing spots, and patches of endangered wild orchids to ancient First Nations’ sites and bird colonies. Harrington, the executive director of the LTABC, has edited and published several books and journals. Stevenson has written for television, radio, and print media and is a research and communications consultant. Both live on Salt Spring Island. More

John Muir: West Coast Pioneer
by Daryl Ashby
Publisher: Ronsdale Press

John Muir: West Coast Pioneer

This historical biography—based on the life of British Columbia pioneer John Muir—tells the story of a family from Scotland who came out to Canada in the late 1840s to work as “consignee” labourers for the Hudson’s Bay Company. Ashby recreates the story of the Muirs’ struggle to develop a place for themselves in the hierarchic colony ruled by James Douglas. With their vision of a country based on democratic principles, the Muirs fought to bring a new way of life to the West Coast. Ashby is a Victoria-based historian who has researched the lives of the Muir family for over a decade. He is presently at work on a second book about early Canadian history. More

Stanley Park’s Secret:  The Forgotten Families of Whoi Whoi, Kanaka Ranch, and Brockton Point
by Jean Barman
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

Stanley Park’s Secret:  The Forgotten Families of Whoi Whoi, Kanaka Ranch, and Brockton Point

Working in collaboration with descendants of the families who once lived in what is now Stanley Park, Barman skilfully weaves together personal stories with archival documents, Vancouver Park Board records, and court proceedings to reveal a troubling, yet deeply important facet of BC’s history. Barman is the author of six previous books, including the bestseller The Remarkable Adventures of Portguese Joe Silvey. Her pursuit to understand and uncover the history of British Columbia has earned her a position as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, among other honours. She lives in Vancouver. More

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Sheila A. Egoff Children's Literature Prize

Sponsored by the BC Library Association
Judges: Judy Saltman, Rita Ourom and Glenn Huser

Winner! Hannah Waters and the Daughter of Johann Sebastian Bach
by Barbara Nickel
Publisher: Penguin Canada

Hannah Waters and the Daughter of Johann Sebastian Bach

Catherina Bach and Hannah Waters were born centuries apart but when they touch, their lives begin to entwine like the melodies of the piece that joins them, the Concerto for Two Violins, by Catherina’s father. As they listen to the music and each other, they begin to make sense of the shared tragedy that so deeply affects them. Nickel is a Vancouver-based award-winning author of young adult fiction, a poet, and an accomplished violinist. Hannah Waters was shortlisted for the Governor General’s Award last year. Nickel’s novel The Secret Wish of Nannerl Mozart was shortlisted for the Mr. Christie Book Award, the Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young People, and the Red Cedar Young Readers’ Choice Award. More

The Convicts
by Iain Lawrence
Publisher: Random House of Canada

The Convicts

After seeing his father hauled off to debtor’s prison, Tom Tin sets out to take revenge on Mr. Goodfellow, the man responsible for his family’s misfortunes. But the fog-filled London streets are teeming with sinister characters, and ultimately, Tom comes up against the cruel hand of the law. Accused of murder, Tom is given a seven-year sentence and is to be transported to Van Diemen’s Land with other juvenile convicts. But he can’t abide life on the Hulk, the old ship where the boys are temporarily held. He decides to escape. But if he’s to succeed, his luck needs to turn. Lawrence is the author of many acclaimed novels, including the High Seas Trilogy: The Wreckers, The Smugglers, and The Buccaneers. He lives on Gabriola Island. More

The Crazy Man
by Pamela Porter
Publisher: Groundwood Books

The Crazy Man

In this Governor General’s Award–winning book, Porter uses free verse to tell a moving story set in Southern Saskatchewan in 1965. Twelve-year-old Emaline lives on a wheat farm. Tormented by grief after a tragic accident that leaves her with a permanent disability, Emaline’s father abandons the family and her mother hires Angus, a patient from the local mental hospital, to work their fields. Though the small town’s prejudice creates a cloud of suspicion around Angus that nearly results in tragedy, in the end he becomes a force for healing as Emaline comes to terms with her injury and the loss of her father. Porter lives in Sidney. Her husband’s family has operated a family farm near Weyburn, Saskatchewan, for generations. More

Four Steps to Death
by John Wilson
Publisher: Kids Can Press

Four Steps to Death

Set during the battle and siege of Stalingrad in 1942, Wilson revisits the horrific 229-day impasse that resulted in more than one million deaths and marked a crucial turning point in World War II, after which the Germans never won a major battle. In this novel, the lives of a German tank officer, a patriotic Russian soldier, and an eight-year-old boy intertwine over seven days of fierce and deadly street-by-street fighting. Wilson teaches English at Malaspina University-College in Nanaimo and gives readings and workshops at schools and conferences across Canada. A prolific writer and avid traveller, he specializes in making history come alive for kids.

The Vacation
by Polly Horvath
Publisher: Groundwood Books

The Vacation

Left temporarily in the care of his sick and crabby Aunt Magnolia and increasingly assertive Aunt Pigg, Henry reluctantly finds himself on a destination-less road trip through Virginia Beach, the Everglades, and Oklahoma. Henry is often in despair—until he surrenders to the road and decides to let whatever happens happen. With a cast of eccentric characters, absurd situations, and heartfelt moments, this is an on-the-road epic like no other. Horvath has written many award-winning books for children, including Everything on a Waffle, which won the Sheila A. Egoff Prize in 2002, and The Canning Season, which was shortlisted in 2004. She lives in Metchosin. More

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Christie Harris Illustrated Children's Literature Prize

Sponsored by an anonymous donor
Judges: Ron Jobe, Janice Douglas and Cynthia Nugent

Winner! The Blue Jean Book: The Story Behind the Seams
by Tanya Lloyd Kyi
Publisher: Annick Press

The Blue Jean Book: The Story Behind the Seams

This book takes you deep into the world of denim, from its origins with hardscrabble miners and cowboys to its embrace by labourers, rebels, and the incurably hip. Amazing archival photos thread together the social history of the world’s most beloved article of clothing. Lloyd Kyi is a Vancouver-based writer, whose recent young adult titles include Fires!, part of the True Stories from the Edge series, and My Time as Caz Hazard.

Bamboo
by Paul Yee
Illustrated by Shaoli Wang
Publisher: Tradewind Books

Bamboo

In a Chinese village, a simple farmer named Bamboo and a peasant girl named Ming celebrate their wedding by planting a grove of bamboo. When he leaves for the New World, though, his sister-in-law, Jin, makes life miserable for Ming, who finds help and sustenance from a mysterious force. Yee was born in Saskatchewan and grew up in Vancouver’s Chinatown. A recipient of the Governor General’s Award, he has written numerous historical works and children’s books, including The Ghost Train, The Jade Necklace, and The Bone Collector’s Son. He currently lives in Toronto. Born and raised in Qing Dao, China, Shaoli Wang has won great acclaim for her paintings and has exhibited widely. She lives in Coquitlam. More

The Kids Book of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada
by Diane Silvey
Illustrated by John Manth
Publisher: Kids Can Press

The Kids Book of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada

Exhaustively researched and reviewed by specialists in the field, this groundbreaking book is by far the most comprehensive of its kind. The detailed illustrations, based on museum artifacts, written records of long ago, and contemporary scholarship, help bring traditional aboriginal ways to life for young readers. Silvey is the author of Little Bear’s Vision Quest and Whale Girl and has developed thirteen curriculum books for non-readers, seventeen mini-readers, and a First Nations cultural book. She currently teaches at Blanshard Elementary School in Victoria. Mantha is a Toronto-based freelancer who has illustrated seven books. His other clients include Fox Television, Imperial Oil, Penguin Books, Better Homes and Gardens magazine, and Cottage Life magazine. More

The Milkman
by Carol Foskett Cordsen
Illustrated by Douglas B. Jones
Publisher: Dutton

The Milkman

With its cheery 1940s retro art, a rhyming read-aloud rhythm, and its small-town nostalgia, this good-humoured tale follows a helpful milkman and his cranky kitty as they make their morning rounds. The milkman knows his hometown: he knows who needs ice cream for a birthday party, who just broke a leg, who has a new baby. He even helps to return a lost dog that’s hiding along his route. Foskett Cordsen grew up in the small town of Fort Collins, Colorado, where every house in the neighbourhood had a milk box on the front porch. This is her first book. Jones is a Victoria-based illustrator who has done editorial and advertising work for clients around the world.

Picturescape
by Elisa Gutiérrez
Publisher: Simply Read Books

Picturescape

When a young boy visits the local art gallery, he is whisked away on a cross-country Canadian journey as he moves from painting to painting. Each collage image in this book was created with coloured pencils and cut paper and inspired by some of the most beloved Canadian artists including Emily Carr, Tom Thomson, David Blackwood, Alex Colville, Lawren Harris, E. J. Hughes, William Kurelek, J. P. Lemieux, and Christopher Pratt. Gutiérrez is an illustrator and graphic designer born in Mexico City. She has worked on a wide variety of projects in Canada, including the design of many books for children, and has won awards in Mexico for her design work. She lives in Vancouver. More

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BC Booksellers' Choice Award in Honour of Bill Duthie

Sponsored by the BC Booksellers’ Association and Duthie Books

Winner! Waterfront: The Illustrated Maritime Story of Greater Vancouver
by James P. Delgado
Publisher: Stanton Atkins & Dosil Publishers

Waterfront: The Illustrated Maritime Story of Greater Vancouver

From prehistoric mariners who ventured out of the Arctic wastes after the last great ice age to European explorers who sought a fabled passage to the riches of the Orient to enterprising shipping magnates and immigrants, this lively illustrated tour entwines their tales with the birth and growth of cities, ports, industries, and companies. Delgado is executive director of the Vancouver Maritime Museum. He is the author or editor of twenty-nine books and numerous articles and archaeological reports covering a wide range of subjects related to the histories of shipwrecks. His books Lost Warships: An Archaeological Tour of War at Sea and Across the Top of the World: The Quest for the Northwest Passage are both international bestsellers published simultaneously in North America and Britain. More

Islands in the Salish Sea: A Community Atlas
by Sheila Harrington, Judith Stevenson, and Kathy Dunster
Publisher: TouchWood Editions

Islands in the Salish Sea: A Community Atlas

Created by community groups, sponsored by the Land Trust Alliance of British Columbia, and supported by funding agencies and individual donors, this unconventional map collection shows places on the Gulf Islands that are most beloved by their residents, from heritage orchards, fishing spots, and patches of endangered wild orchids to ancient First Nations’ sites and bird colonies. Harrington, the executive director of the LTABC, has edited and published several books and journals. Stevenson has written for television, radio, and print media and is a research and communications consultant. Both live on Salt Spring Island. More

Marine Life of the Pacific Northwest
by Andy Lamb, Bernard Hanby
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

Marine Life of the Pacific Northwest

With 1,700 colour photographs of more than 1,400 species, this collection of photographs of Pacific Northwest marine life is the most comprehensive ever published and is designed so readers can recognize virtually any coastal organism that might be encountered from Southern Alaska to Southern Oregon. Lamb is a marine naturalist and educator who has worked as chief collector at the Vancouver Aquarium and as a fish culturist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada. He lives in North Vancouver. Hanby is an avid amateur photographer and scuba diver who serves on the Conservation and Research Committee of the Vancouver Aquarium Marine SeaLife Science Centre. He lives in West Vancouver. More

Terry
by Douglas Coupland
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Terry

Published in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the beginning of his extraordinary run, this book honours Terry Fox, who dared to confront personal adversity with selfless courage. Written with the support of the Fox family, Terry’s design reflects the style of Coupland’s Souvenir projects, mixing more than 145 photographs of a previously unknown collection of family memorabilia with very moving text about Terry’s life and the Marathon of Hope. An author, artist, and designer, Coupland was raised in West Vancouver, where he still resides. Among his bestsellers are Generation X, Polaroids from the Dead, Microserfs, and City of Glass. More

Three Rivers: The Yukon’s Great Boreal Wilderness
by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

Three Rivers: The Yukon’s Great Boreal Wilderness

Previously unknown to the outside world, the Yukon’s Three Rivers watershed is emerging as an environmental issue of global importance—a key piece of the boreal region that is under threat from gas and mining development. Packed with photography, art, and writings by such notables as Courtney Milne, Margaret Atwood, and John Ralston Saul, Three Rivers offers a tour of a natural wonderland so rich in grizzly bears, wolves, caribou, peregrine falcons, and wildflowers that most will have difficulty believing such a place still exists. Juri Peepre coordinated the Three Rivers project and was Yukon Executive Director of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society until 2004. Peepre has contributed numerous essays and photographs to books on the Yukon environment, including Yukon Wild, and was a contributing author to Parks and Protected Areas in Canada, Protecting Canada’s Endangered Spaces, and Unimpaired for Future Generations: Conserving Ecological Integrity with Canada’s National Parks. He and co-editor Locke live in Whitehorse, Yukon. More

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Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Literary Excellence

Winner! Jack Hodgins

Jack Hodgins

The Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Literary Excellence was established in 2003 by the Honourable Iona Campagnolo to recognize British Columbia writers who have contributed to the development of literary excellence in the Province. As the inaugural winner, P. K. Page was selected by an independent jury consisting of three prominent figures from the British Columbia literary community. This year the Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Literary Excellence is awarded to Jack Hodgins.

“It was forty years ago that Jack Hodgins started systematically sending stories to magazines. Thirty years ago, ten of those exquisite early stories were collected into a book that remains both an unforgettable portrait of British Columbia life and a literary classic: Spit Delaney’s Island. In novels such as The Invention of the World, The Resurrection of Joseph Bourne (which won him a Governor General’s Award in 1979), The Barclay Family Theatre, The Macken Charm, and Broken Ground, Hodgins has continued deepening and broadening his multivolume, panoramic portrait of Vancouver Island people, dwarfed by their own dreams and extravagant ambitions as much as they are by the trees in the old-growth forests. The marriage, in a single human being, of such acute perception, extravagant imagination, and personal reserve makes Jack Hodgins himself as thoroughly unlikely yet as absolutely real as any of his characters. And no writer has done more than he to give British Columbia a place on the literary map of North America.”
— Jury member Robert Bringhurst

Jack Hodgins was born in Comox in 1938, and raised in the logging community of Merville. After graduating from the University of British Columbia, he moved to Nanaimo, where he taught high school English until 1979. He has been a writer-in-residence at Simon Fraser University and the University of Ottawa, and taught fiction workshops at the University of Victoria from 1983 to 2002. He most recently taught at the Banff Centre for the Arts. He lives in Cadboro Bay, Victoria, with his wife Dianne.

By any standards, the literary career of Jack Hodgins has been spectacular. His first book, a collection of short stories entitled Spit Delaney’s Island, was nominated for the 1976 Governor General’s Award. A year later, his first novel, The Invention of the World, won the Gibson’s First Novel Award.

Since that time, the author has written many books, including one for children, Left Behind in Squabble Bay, and a guide to fiction writing, A Passion for Narrative. He has read from his work in countries as distant as Japan and Australia, and his list of awards is extraordinary, including the Governor General’s Award (1979), Commonwealth Literary Prize (1988 Regional), Canada-Australia Literary Prize (1986), and Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize (1999). He has also received three honorary degrees and been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. This spring, he was also the recipient of the Terasen Lifetime Achievement Award for an Outstanding Literary Career in British Columbia.

Jury: Robert Bringhurst, Thora Howell and Hal Wake

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