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2010 Finalists

The West Coast Book Prize Society is thrilled to announce the finalists for the 2010 BC Book Prizes. Congratulations to the authors and their publishers!

Winners announced April 24, 2010 | emcee Shelagh Rogers | Government House, Victoria

 

Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize

Supported by Friesens and Webcom
Judges: Claudia Casper, Lee Henderson, Ann McDonell

Winner! Having Faith in the Polar Girls’ Prison
by Cathleen With
Publisher: Penguin Group Canada

Having Faith in the Polar Girls’ Prison

Against the stark and haunting landscape of Canada’s Far North, fifteen-year-old Trista chronicles the events of her life from her room in the Polar Girls’ Prison. Caught in the decline of sexual abuse, drunkenness, and failed motherhood, Trista tries to make sense of her past, especially the events that led her to jail. Within the grim confines of the prison there are acts of kindness on the part of the staff and Trista’s fellow detainees, there is the thrill of Trista’s illicit romance, the memories of her mother, her best friend, and times spent with the Snow Nanuks, elder women who live according to Inuit tradition.  The young woman’s stream-of-consciousness narration, through memories of the past and visions of the future, takes the reader far beyond the prison’s walls. Cathleen With, author of the story collection Skids, has worked as a teacher in Inuvik and Seoul. She lives in Vancouver.  More

8 x 10
by Michael Turner
Publisher: Doubleday Canada

8 x 10

Fearless in form, 8 × 10 casts aside traditional narrative structure and characterization to delve deeper into the issues gnawing at today’s global society. Through a sequence of possibly intertwined events, the author creates a challenging portrait of our modern age, drawing solely on the actions of people rather than their appearance — whether advertising executives or soldiers, tailors or doctors — they fall in love, have children, fight in wars, and flee their homes. In 8 × 10 there are no names, no racial or ethnic characteristics, and only a vague sense of time.  Michael Turner’s first book, Company Town, was nominated for the 1992 Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize. His second book, Hard Core Logo, was made into an acclaimed feature film and his screenplay-cum-novel, American Whiskey Bar, was produced as a live television special on CityTV in 1998. He lives in Vancouver.  More

Daniel O’Thunder
by Ian Weir
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Daniel O’Thunder

In the 1850s, in the slums of London, Daniel O’Thunder, a troubled but charismatic former prize-fighter turned evangelist, runs a safe house for those in need of food, shelter, prayer and good counsel. But in the dark streets an ancient evil is stirring, throwing into peril the lives of the city’s most vulnerable souls. O’Thunder, no longer young but still wielding a right fist dubbed “The Hammer of Heaven,” returns to the ring to start training for his greatest fight yet — with the Devil himself.  Surrounding O’Thunder is a strange collection of admirers: Jack, a spectacularly failed cleric and actor who is the compiler of O’Thunder’s story; Jaunty Rennert, a shady small-time operator and Nell, the prostitute who will carry her love for O’Thunder into the wilds of the Cariboo gold rush. Ian Weir is an award-winning screenwriter, playwright and novelist with over 100 television credits as a writer and executive producer. He lives in Langley.  More

The Golden Mean
by Annabel Lyon
Publisher: Random House Canada

The Golden Mean

On the orders of his boyhood friend, now King Philip of Macedon, Aristotle postpones his dreams of succeeding Plato as leader of the Academy in Athens and reluctantly arrives in the Macedonian capital of Pella to tutor the king’s adolescent son, Alexander the Great. Aristotle warms to the challenge of instructing his young charge in whom he recognizes a kindred spirit, an engaged, questioning mind coupled with a unique sense of position and destiny. He feels that teaching this startling, charming, sometimes horrifying boy is a desperate necessity. And that what the boy — thrown before his time onto his father’s battlefields — needs most is to learn the golden mean, that elusive balance between extremes that Aristotle hopes will mitigate the boy’s will to conquer. Annabel Lyon’s second book, The Best Thing for You, was nominated for the 2005 Ethel Wilson Prize for Fiction. She lives in New Westminster.  More

Vanishing and Other Stories
by Deborah Willis
Publisher: Penguin Group Canada

Vanishing and Other Stories

Evocative and passionately written, Vanishing and Other Stories explores emotional and physical absences, the ways in which people leave and are left, and whether it’s ever possible to move on. Readers will encounter a skinny, freckled ice-cream scooper named after Nina Simone, a visionary of social utopia, a French teacher who collects fiancés and a fortune-telling mother who fails to predict the heartbreak of her own daughter. In the title story, a writer vanishes, leaving unfinished work and unanswerable questions. A doctor, mourning a loss, takes up blackjack. After his wife leaves, an aging cowboy is seduced by a city girl. In these stories, secrets are both kept and unearthed, and lives are shaped by missing lovers, parents and children. Deborah Willis was a winner of PRISM International’s annual fiction prize and her work has appeared in literary journals across Canada. Born in Calgary, she now lives in Victoria.  More

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Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize

Supported by Abebooks
Judges: Ron Smith, Rex Weyler, Gudrun Will

Winner! Small Beneath the Sky: A Prairie Memoir
by Lorna Crozier
Publisher: Greystone Books

Small Beneath the Sky: A Prairie Memoir

A volume of poignant recollections by one of Canada’s most celebrated poets, Small Beneath the Sky is a tender, unsparing portrait of a family and a place. Lorna Crozier vividly depicts her hometown of Swift Current, with its one main street, two high schools, and three beer parlors — where her father spent most of his evenings. She writes unflinchingly about the grief and shame caused by poverty and alcoholism. At the heart of the book is the author’s fierce love for her mother, Peggy. The narratives of daily life — sometimes funny, sometimes heartbreaking — are interspersed with prose poems. Lorna Crozier has authored fourteen books of poetry since the launch of first collection, Inside in the Sky, in 1976. Her collection, What the Living Won’t Let Go, won the 2000 Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize. She lives in North Saanich and serves as Chair in the Writing Department at the University of Victoria.  More

The Ice Passage: A True Story of Ambition, Disaster, and Endurance in the Arctic Wilderness
by Brian Payton
Publisher: Doubleday Canada

The Ice Passage: A True Story of Ambition, Disaster, and Endurance in the Arctic Wilderness

Four years after the disappearance of Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin and his two ships, the HMS Investigator sets sail in search of them. Instead of rescuing lost comrades, the officers and crew soon find themselves trapped in their own ordeal, facing starvation, madness and death on the unknown Polar Sea. If only they can save themselves, they will bring back news of perhaps the greatest maritime achievement of the age: their discovery of the elusive Northwest Passage between Europe and the Orient. But the cost of hubris, ignorance, daring and deceit is soon laid bare. In the face of catastrophe, a desperate rescue plan is made to send away the weakest men to meet their fate on the ice. Drawing on long-forgotten journals, transcripts and correspondence, Payton weaves an astonishing tale of endurance. Brian Payton’s previous books include Hail Mary Corner and Shadow of the Bear: Travels in Vanishing Wilderness. He lives in Vancouver.  More

Savage Gods, Silver Ghosts: In the Wild with Ted Hughes
by Ehor Boyanowsky
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Savage Gods, Silver Ghosts: In the Wild with Ted Hughes

They met at a poetry reading, but Ehor Boyanowsky and British Poet Laureate Ted Hughes became friends through their shared passion for fishing. Against the backdrop of the Dean River, one of the world’s greatest steelhead rivers, the two men explored their mutual regard for the planet’s wild places. Boyanowsky draws on personal correspondence, interviews and journal entries to recreate their encounters and to paint an intimate portrait of a lifelong outdoorsman, conservationist and artist. In these tales of male friendship and the primal act of fly-fishing, the reader gets glimpses of the “nature red in tooth and claw” that drew Ted Hughes to Canada — and rekindled his love of the natural world. Ehor Boyanowsky, a criminal psychologist and professor at Simon Fraser University, has written extensively on conservation issues and is the co-author of The Pocket Guide to Fly Fishing for Steelhead. He lives in West Vancouver.  More

Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life
by Brian Brett
Publisher: Greystone Books

Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life

Beginning naked in darkness, Brian Brett moves from the tending of livestock, poultry, orchards, gardens, machinery and fields to the social intricacies of rural communities and, finally, to an encounter with a magnificent deer in the silver moonlight of a magical farm field. Brett understands both tall tales and rigorous science as he explores the small mixed farm — meditating on the perfection of the egg and the nature of soil while also offering a scathing critique of agribusiness and the horror of modern slaughterhouses. Whether discussing the misuses of gates or bantering with neighbours, he remains aware of the miracles of life, birth, and death that confront the rural world every day. Brian Brett is the author of Uproar’s Your Only Music and several books of poetry. His journalism has appeared in major Canadian newspapers including the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star and the Vancouver Sun. He lives on Salt Spring Island.  More

Vancouver Special
by Charles Demers
Publisher: Arsenal Pulp Press

Vancouver Special

Vancouver is at a crossroads in its history — host to the 2010 Winter Olympics and home to the poorest neighbourhood in Canada; a young, multicultural city with a vibrant surface and a violent undercoat a savvy urban centre with an inferiority complex. Charles Demers examines the who, what, where, when, why and how of Vancouver, shedding light on the various strategies and influences that have made the city what it is today (as well as what it should be). From a history of anti-Asian racism to a deconstruction of the city’s urban sprawl; from an examination of local food trends to a survey of the city’s politically radical past, Vancouver Special is a love letter to the city, taking a no-holds-barred look at Lotusland with verve, wit and insight. Charles Demers is an activist and comedian, a performer on CBC Radio One’s “The Debaters” and co-host of CityTV’s comedic panel show “The Citynews List” in Vancouver.  More

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Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize

Supported by the BC Teachers’ Federation
Judges: Wayde Compton, Carla Funk, Betsy Warland

Winner! is a door
by Fred Wah
Publisher: Talonbooks

is a door

Including poetry projects, a chapbook and incidental poems, is a door makes use of the poem’s ability for “suddenness” to subvert closure: the sudden question, the sudden turn, the sudden opening — writing that is generated from linguistic mindfulness, improvisation, compositional problem-solving, collaborative events, travel, investigation and documentary — in short, poetry as practice. Much of this poetry is framed by Fred Wah’s acute sense of the marginalized non-urban local “place” and coloured by his attempt to articulate senses of otherness and resistance. Fred Wah was one of the founding editors of the poetry newsletter TISH and a pioneer of on-line publishing. He is the author of seventeen books of poetry including Waiting For Saskatchewan which received the Governor General’s Award in 1985. Diamond Grill, a biofiction about hybridity and growing up in a small-town Chinese-Canadian café won the Howard O’Hagan Award for Short Fiction in 1996. He lives in Vancouver.  More

Automaton Biographies
by Larissa Lai
Publisher: Arsenal Pulp Press

Automaton Biographies

With an ear to the white noise of advertising, pop music, CNN, biotechnology, the Norton Anthology of English Literature, cereal packaging and MuchMusic, Larissa Lai explores the problem of what it means to exist on the boundaries of the human. The books consists of four long poems: “Rachel,” a meditation in the voice of the cyborg figure Rachel from Ridley Scott’s film Blade Runner and its source material, Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? ; “nascent fashion,” which addresses contemporary war and its excesses; “Ham,” which circulates around the chimpanzee sent up into space as part of the Mercury Redstone missions by NASA and later donated to the Coulston Foundation for biomedical research; and “auto matter,” a kind of unfolding autobiography told in poems. Larissa Lai, an Assistant Professor in Canadian Literature at the University of British Columbia, is the author of Salt Fish Girl and When Fox is A ThousandMore

The Fly in Autumn
by David Zieroth
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

The Fly in Autumn

The Fly in Autumn is a nuanced work with an absurdist twist in which recognizable landscapes — of North Vancouver quays and piers and harbour fog — are sometimes irrevocably altered by “water-light” into places of the mind alive with “the hundred thousand thoughts everyone collects in a day.” Using language both tender and ironic, Zieroth’s poems range from the cockiness of flight to the inevitability of decline. Still, the poet remains alert to the re-emergence of “his boyhood hope: to be brave, to ship out, to learn to sleep on waves.” David Zieroth’s poetry has appeared in dozens of anthologies and he has written eight books including How I Joined Humanity at Last, winner of the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize in 1999. He taught at Douglas College in New Westminster, BC, for 25 years before retiring and founding the Alfred Gustav Press. He lives in North Vancouver.  More

Harbour
by Miranda Pearson
Publisher: Oolichan Books

Harbour

Harbour looks at ways humans are driven to construct territory in whatever space is available, however borrowed or makeshift. In the first section, “Asylum,” Miranda Pearson turns to her experience of working in psychiatry. We hear the voices of both caregivers and patients, and flit back and forth between these two roles, contrasting and unraveling their meaning. Moving from hospitals to museums, the poems explore the tensions between antiquity and modernity, and how we collect and display artifacts, preserving life in frozen morgue-like containment. Ideas on hoarding are touched upon, how even assembling a collection of poetry is a type of acquisition — of imagery, words, ideas, and other texts. Harbour — the noun and the verb are interchangeable — illuminates the human drive to nest, gathering together ideas on how we seek refuge, a sanctuary, a keep. Miranda Pearson is the author of two previous books of poetry, Prime and The Aviary. She lives in Vancouver.  More

Red Nest
by Gillian Jerome
Publisher: Nightwood Editions

Red Nest

Enter the surreal adventure that is Gillian Jerome’s debut collection of domestic, urban and intergalactic eclogues. Just when you’ve been ambushed by gods and stars, you’re catapulted back into a wild sprawling city filled with cordless phones, coyotes and the hairdos of dandelions. The brave and rambunctious creatures in this book nest in the humour and horror of the 21st-century. The poems explore universal themes such as violence, war, poverty, love and domesticity, neighbourhoods and the importance of community. Gillian Jerome’s first non-fiction book, Hope in Shadows: Stories and Photographs from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, won the 2009 City of Vancouver Book Award and was a finalist title for the 2009 Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize. Jerome teaches literature at UBC and her poetry has been anthologized in Breathing Fire 2: Canada’s New Poets. She lives in Vancouver.  More

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Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize


Judges: John Lent, Rebecca Wigod, Daniel Wood

Winner! Encyclopedia of Raincoast Place Names: A Complete Reference to Coastal British Columbia
by Andrew Scott
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

Encyclopedia of Raincoast Place Names: A Complete Reference to Coastal British Columbia

Raincoast Place Names describes the original First Nations cultures, the heroics of the 18th-century explorers and fur traders, the grueling survey and settlement efforts of the 19th century, the lives of colonial officials, missionaries, gold seekers and homesteaders and the histories of nearly every important vessel to sail or cruise the coast. Four thousand entries consider, in intriguing detail, the stories behind over five thousand place names: how they were discovered, who named them and why, and what the names reveal. The book also examines the rich heritage of BC place names added in the 20th century. These new entries reflect the world of the steamship era, the ships and skippers of the Union and Princess lines, the heroes of the two World Wars and the sealing fleet, Esquimalt’s naval base and BC’s fishing, canning, mining and logging industries. Andrew Scott is the author of five previous books. He lives in Sechelt.  More

All That We Say Is Ours: Guujaaw and the Reawakening of the Haida Nation
by Ian Gill
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

All That We Say Is Ours: Guujaaw and the Reawakening of the Haida Nation

In the 1970s, after decades of rapacious logging, the Haidi joined forces with environmentalists in a high-profile struggle to save the Haidi Gwaii islands, a West Coast archipelago famous for its wild beauty. The battle found powerful expression through Giindajin Haawasti Guujaaw, the visionary artist, drummer and orator who would later become president of the Council of the Haida Nation. Combining first-person accounts with vivid prose, the author captures the excitement of their struggle, from high-octane logging blockades to defiant legal challenges. Guujaaw’s audacity, eloquence, tactical skills and deep knowledge of his homeland put him at the heart of the struggle, and All That We Say Is Ours reveals the extraordinary role he played in this incredible story. Ian Gill, a filmmaker, conservationist and award-winning documentary reporter, has spent fifteen years as head of Ecotrust Canada, one of North America’s leading conservation and community development organizations. He lives in Vancouver. More

Jacob’s Prayer
by Lorne Dufour
Publisher: Caitlin Press

Jacob’s Prayer

In 1974 Lorne Dufour moved to Alkali Lake Reserve, a Shuswap community near Williams Lake, to help reopen the local elementary school. Like many First Nation communities across Canada, Alkali Lake had been ravaged by decades of residential schools, forced religion, abuse and alcoholism. But Chief Andy Chelsea and his wife Phyllis took it upon themselves to lead their community on a long and painful road to sobriety and what ensued was a dramatic transformation of a people enslaved by a seemingly unstoppable plague. The story centres around one tragic Halloween evening in 1975 when two men lose their lives and another is saved by a friend who chooses not to be destroyed by his own devastating loss. Lorne Dufour has worked as a teacher, a counsellor, a logger, a travelling showman and a poet. He is a handlogger and lives off the grid in McLeese Lake, BC.  More

A Thousand Dreams: Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside and the Fight for Its Future
by Larry Campbell, Lori Culbert, Neil Boyd
Publisher: Greystone Books

A Thousand Dreams: Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside and the Fight for Its Future

A Thousand Dreams raises provocative questions about the challenges confronting not only Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside but also all of North America’s major cities and offers concrete, urgently needed solutions including continued support for safe injection sites, the decriminalization of prostitution and drugs and more affordable social housing. In this mix of history, journalism, political analysis and first-person accounts, former chief coroner and Vancouver mayor Larry Campbell, renowned criminologist Neil Boyd and investigative journalist Lori Culbert, offer a portrait of one of North America’s poorest, most drug-challenged neighbourhoods: Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Neil Boyd is a professor and associate director of the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University. Lori Culbert is an award-winning journalist with the Vancouver Sun. Larry Campbell was mayor of Vancouver from 2002 to 2005 and oversaw the establishment of North America’s first legal injection site. His career as chief coroner for B.C. inspired the television series Da Vinci’s Inquest. More

Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life
by Brian Brett
Publisher: Greystone Books

Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life

Beginning naked in darkness, Brian Brett moves from the tending of livestock, poultry, orchards, gardens, machinery and fields to the social intricacies of rural communities and, finally, to an encounter with a magnificent deer in the silver moonlight of a magical farm field. Brett understands both tall tales and rigorous science as he explores the small mixed farm — meditating on the perfection of the egg and the nature of soil while also offering a scathing critique of agribusiness and the horror of modern slaughterhouses. Whether discussing the misuses of gates or bantering with neighbours, he remains aware of the miracles of life, birth, and death that confront the rural world every day. Brian Brett is the author of Uproar’s Your Only Music and several books of poetry. His journalism has appeared in major Canadian newspapers including the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star and the Vancouver Sun. He lives on Salt Spring Island.  More

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Sheila A. Egoff Children’s Literature Prize

Supported by the BC Library Association
Judges: Lois Brymer, John Burns, Ann Walsh

Winner! The Gryphon Project
by Carrie Mac
Publisher: Penguin Group Canada

The Gryphon Project

Phoenix envies her brother Gryphon. The daredevil and sports hero has all of his recons left: three more chances at life. But she is left with only one, and learns that her beloved brother is responsible for one of her deaths. When Gryphon himself has an accident, the governing body Chrysalis refuses to recon him, deeming his death to be a suicide. His friends’ code of silence makes it difficult to find out what happened, but Phoenix is determined to unravel the mystery and save her brother. Carrie Mac is the author of nine novels including Charmed, Crush, the Triskelia series and Pain & Wastings. Her novel The Beckoners won the Arthur Ellis YA Award, is a CLA Honour book, and has been optioned for film. She was raised in small-town British Columbia and now lives in Vancouver.  More

Counting on Hope
by Sylvia Olsen
Publisher: Sono Nis Press

Counting on Hope

Set against the backdrop of the confusing events surrounding the English colonization of British Columbia, and an 1863 naval assault on Kuper Island, Counting on Hope tells the story of two girls whose lives are profoundly changed when their two cultures collide. Alternating between free verse and prose, Sylvia Olsen follows the girl’s individual storylines before, during and after their meeting. She captures the wonder and joy with which Hope and Letia develop their friendship and describes the tragic events, suspicion, fear and confusion that characterize so many early encounters between Europeans and the First Peoples. This sensitively drawn depiction of innocence lost and wisdom hard won follows Hope and Letia out of childhood, off their island paradise and into the complex realities of an adult world. Married into the Tsartlip First Nation at seventeen, Sylvia Olsen is a historian specializing in Native/White relations in Canada, and the author of twelve books. She lives in Victoria.  More

Inferno
by Robin Stevenson
Publisher: Orca Book Publishers

Inferno

Dante thinks high school is an earthly version of hell. She hates her new home in the suburbs, her best friend has moved away, her homeroom teacher mocks her and her mother is making her attend a social skills group for teenage girls. When a stranger shows up at school and hands Dante a flyer that reads: Woof, woof. You are not a dog. Why are you going to obedience school? , Dante thinks she’s found a soul mate and is ready for a change…but some changes are more dangerous than others. Robin Stevenson is the author of several novels for teens, including Dead in the Water, Out of Order and Big Guy. Her previous novel, A Thousand Shades of Blue, was a finalist for the 2009 Sheila A. Egoff Children’s Literature Prize. A former social worker, counselor and university instructor, Stevenson lives in Victoria.  More

Return to Bone Tree Hill
by Kristin Butcher
Publisher: Thistledown Press

Return to Bone Tree Hill

Did Jessica murder one of her playmates, a troubled boy named Charlie when she was twelve years old? A recurring dream forces her to ask that question. Disturbed by the vision and needing to clear her conscience, Jessica returns to Victoria, her hometown and the site of the possible crime. There she catches up with her best friend, Jilly, who confirms that Charlie did in fact go missing the week that Jessica’s family relocated to Australia. But a memory-erasing bout of meningitis at the time of the incident means Jessica doesn’t recall the questioning police officers, the extensive ground search, or being the last person to see Charlie alive. Will Jessica be able to acquit herself of murder or will her memory of Charlie’s death remain a fear she must learn to live with? Kristin Butcher is the author of fifteen books including The Gramma War, Chat Room and Zee’s Way. She lives in Campbell River.  More

The Ship of Lost Souls
by Rachelle Delaney
Publisher: HarperTrophyCanada

The Ship of Lost Souls

Legend has it there’s a treasure in the Islands. Everyone’s after it, including Jem Fitzgerald and his explorer uncle, Finn, the Islanders, and pirates. Even the infamous crew known as the Lost Souls — rumoured to be ghosts — has set their spyglasses on it. Only Uncle Finn holds the map to the treasure but when he’s kidnapped by the pirates, he quickly hands off the precious map to Jem, who isis rescued by the Lost Souls. It’s the fright of his life until he discovers that the so-called ghosts are actually children, led by the daring young captain Scarlet McCray! But can Scarlet convince Jem to give up the map? Can she quiet the mutinous rumblings of her crew or will the reign of the Lost Souls end with her? Rachelle Delaney has received the Grant MacEwan Young Writers’ Scolarship, the Larry Turner Award and the Bissenden Scholarship for creative writing. She lives in Vancouver.  More

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Christie Harris Illustrated Children’s Literature Prize

Supported by Kate Walker and Company
Judges: Rae Maté, Phyllis Simon, Maggie de Vries

Winner! Maggie Can’t Wait
by Frieda Wishinsky
Illustrated by Dean Griffiths
Publisher: Fitzhenry & Whiteside

Maggie Can’t Wait

Maggie can’t wait to show her friends the picture of her soon-to-be adopted sister, but she is mortified by their reaction. Maybe the baby is as ugly as they say. Maybe her parents shouldn’t adopt that baby after all. But could it be that beauty is in the eye of the beholder? A delightful sequel to Give Maggie a Chance, Maggie Can’t Wait again features the little girl with the big imagination as she dreads the arrival of a new adopted sister and learns how easy it is to make up her own mind. Frieda Wishinsky is the author of many children’s books, including Jennifer Jones Won’t Leave Me Alone, The Man Who Made Parks and Nothing Scares Us. In 1999, Frieda was shortlisted for a Governor General’s Award for Each One Special. She lives in Toronto. Dean Griffiths is an illustrator and computer graphics animator from Duncan.  More

Bubble Homes and Fish Farts
by Fiona Bayrock
Illustrated by Carolyn Conahan
Publisher: Charlesbridge

Bubble Homes and Fish Farts

Bubbles are for popping, fishing, talking-and for sailing, keeping warm, and even shooting hoops! Who knew animals used bubbles in so many ways? Learn how the water spider builds an underwater bubble home, how snapping shrimp pop bubbles to scare other animals, and how dolphins play with bubbles as if it’s a game. Whether they are riding, breathing, or making bubbles, one thing is for sure-animals use bubbles in amazing ways. Real-world science meets tongue-in-cheek humor to describe how animals use bubbles. Lighthearted conversational text is accompanied by delightful full-bleed watercolour illustrations. Fiona Bayrock has written fifteen books and numerous articles and stories for children. She lives in Chilliwack. Carolyn Conahan is the staff illustrator for Cricket magazine and lives in Portland, Oregon.  More

Ella’s Umbrellas
by Jennifer Lloyd
Illustrated by Ashley Spires
Publisher: Simply Read Books

Ella’s Umbrellas

Ella has every umbrella under the rainbow from aquamarine to jellybean green. Her umbrellas fill up the entire house. Aunt Stella from Katmandu is coming to visit and Ella’s mom demands that Ella get rid of her umbrellas. But Ella wants to keep her precious possessions. Brought to life through rhythmic text and watercolor illustrations, this is the perfect book to cheer anyone up on a drizzly day. Jennifer Lloyd is a kindergarten teacher in Blainville, Quebec, and is the author of One Winter Night and Looking for Loons. Ashley Spires is the illustrator of A Bloom of Friendship: The Story of the Canadian Tulip Festival, which was nominated for the Silver Birch Award, the Hackmatack Children’s Choice Award and the 2007 Red Cedar Award.  More

On My Walk
by Kari-Lynn Winters
Illustrated by Christina Leist
Publisher: Tradewind Books

On My Walk

Mothers and toddlers end up being caught in a summer rainstorm on their walk through Vancouver streets. The simple text, combined with onomatopoeic words and beautiful illustrations, is great for reading aloud. Beautifully illustrated by Christina Leist, this simple story will be a fun bedtime read for everyone. This is Kari-Lynn’s fourth book for young children. Her books have been nominated for the BC Book Prize, the Chocolate Lily Award and Ontario’s Blue Spruce Award. Born and raised in Germany, Christina Leist now lives in Vancouver. Before becoming a full-time illustrator, she worked in advertising as an art director and graphic designer. She is the illustrator of Baad Animals, The Graveyard Hounds and Jack the BearMore

Vanishing Habitats
by Robert Bateman with Nancy Kovacs
Illustrated by Robert Bateman
Publisher: Scholastic Canada / Madison Press

Vanishing Habitats

In Vanishing Habitats, artist and naturalist Robert Bateman shares his love and knowledge of the world’s habitats. Through his paintings and stories, he describes the threats facing all kinds of animals, ranging from Snow Monkeys, Jaguars, and Bison to exotic birds such as Roseate Spoonbills and Burrowing Owls. He explains why these animals and their homes are in danger and describes what steps can be taken to save them. Good science and fine art in the form of Bateman’s iconic paintings of wildlife combine to offer a visually stunning assessment of the fate of deserts, grasslands, boreal, tropical and old-growth forests and the denizens of each. Robert Bateman’s dedication as a naturalist and artist has allowed him to transfer his abilities to children’s books. Vanishing Habitats, Polar Worlds, Birds of Prey and the bestselling Backyard Birds showcase his artistic talent and commitment to nature’s preservation. He lives on Salt Spring Island.  Nancy Kovacs has worked as co-author or editor on all four of Robert Bateman’s children’s books. She lives in Georgetown, Ontario. More

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Bill Duthie Booksellers’ Choice Award

Supported by the Duthie family and independent BC bookstores.
Judged by members of the BC Booksellers’ Association

Winner! Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life
by Brian Brett
Publisher: Greystone Books

Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life

Beginning naked in darkness, Brian Brett moves from the tending of livestock, poultry, orchards, gardens, machinery and fields to the social intricacies of rural communities and, finally, to an encounter with a magnificent deer in the silver moonlight of a magical farm field. Brett understands both tall tales and rigorous science as he explores the small mixed farm — meditating on the perfection of the egg and the nature of soil while also offering a scathing critique of agribusiness and the horror of modern slaughterhouses. Whether discussing the misuses of gates or bantering with neighbours, he remains aware of the miracles of life, birth, and death that confront the rural world every day. Brian Brett is the author of Uproar’s Your Only Music and several books of poetry. His journalism has appeared in major Canadian newspapers including the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star and the Vancouver Sun. He lives on Salt Spring Island.  More

Encyclopedia of Raincoast Place Names: A Complete Reference to Coastal British Columbia
by Andrew Scott
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

Encyclopedia of Raincoast Place Names: A Complete Reference to Coastal British Columbia

Raincoast Place Names describes the original First Nations cultures, the heroics of the 18th-century explorers and fur traders, the grueling survey and settlement efforts of the 19th century, the lives of colonial officials, missionaries, gold seekers and homesteaders and the histories of nearly every important vessel to sail or cruise the coast. Four thousand entries consider, in intriguing detail, the stories behind over five thousand place names: how they were discovered, who named them and why, and what the names reveal. The book also examines the rich heritage of BC place names added in the 20th century. These new entries reflect the world of the steamship era, the ships and skippers of the Union and Princess lines, the heroes of the two World Wars and the sealing fleet, Esquimalt’s naval base and BC’s fishing, canning, mining and logging industries. Andrew Scott is the author of five previous books. He lives in Sechelt.  More

One More Time: The Dal Richards Story
by Dal Richards with Jim Taylor
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

One More Time: The Dal Richards Story

Here are legendary bandleader Dal Richards’ memories of the stars and the wannabes, the hustlers and bootleggers and hat-check chicks, all of whom paraded through his life in the days when Vancouver’s nightclub scene rivaled San Francisco’s and Hollywood’s big-name performers made it a regular tour stop. It was a time when the music business was rich with characters like Two-for, who ran the spotlight at the Cave and frequently took it off the performer to turn it on his girlfriend lest she was cavorting with a new beau, and the one-hit wonder singer and piano player who had to hide between performances because a Mafia hit man was looking to turn out his lights. Dal Richards is a musician, bandleader and radio show host. He lives in Vancouver. Jim Taylor is the author of thirteen books and his sports writing has earned him a lifetime achievement award from Sports Media Canada. He lives in West Vancouver.  More

Red: A Haida Manga
by Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Red: A Haida Manga

Red is the epic tale of a Haida hero, his rage and his quest for retribution. Referencing a classic Haida oral narrative, this full-colour graphic novel documents the story of a leader so blinded by revenge that he leads his community to the brink of war and destruction. Set in the islands off the northwest coast of B.C., it tells the tale of orphan Red and his sister, Jaada. When raiders attack their village, Red, still a boy, escapes dramatically. But Jaada is whisked away. The loss of Jaada breeds a seething anger, and Red sets out to find his sister and exact revenge on her captors. Red blends traditional Haida imagery into a Japanese manga–styled story. Michael Yahgulanaas has exhibited his art throughout Canada. His books include Flight of the Hummingbird, A Tale of Two Shamans, The Last Voyage of the Black Ship and Hachidori, a bestseller in Japan.  More

Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet: BC’s Japanese Canadian Fishermen
by Masako Fukawa, Stanley Fukawa
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet: BC’s Japanese Canadian Fishermen

Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet is an intimate collection of stories of Japanese Canadians on the water, from the first Japanese immigrant’s arrival in 1877 to the present day. The 130-year history of the Nikkei is full of drama, violence, epic struggles against injustice, failures and triumphs. Opposition from other fishermen and government, and racist policies sought to exclude them from the fishery entirely. Here are the real lives of Nikkei fishermen and their families told in their words. Even in the face of inequity, prejudice and inhumanity, the spirit of the Nikkei fishermen has left a legacy. Masako Fukawa has been the principal writer and managing editor of the Nikkei Fisherman titles since the formation of the Nikkei Fishermen Book Committee in 2003. She is a former school administrator and teacher specializing in the story of Japanese Canadians. Stanley Fukawa is the translator, interpreter and contributing writer for Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet. He is on the editorial committee of Nikkei Images, a journal of the Japanese Canadian National Museum. Masako and Stanley live in Burnaby.  More

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Lieutenant Governor's Award for Literary Excellence

Winner! Stan Persky

Stan Persky

Originally from Chicago, IL, Persky emigrated to Canada in 1966. He was instrumental in the evolution of the Georgia Straight Writing Supplement that eventually became New Star Books in the 1970s. Persky has been a columnist for the Vancouver Sun and the Globe and Mail and continues to write for the website Dooneyscafe.com.

He is the author of twenty books, sixteen of which he has published with New Star Books. In 2006, The Short Version was the winner of the Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize. On Kiddie Porn, co-written with John Dixon, was 2002 runner-up for the Donner Prize.

“We have chosen Stan Persky as the recipient of the 2010 Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Literary Excellence because of the intellectual and moral integrity he brings to his work as a writer who engages with some of the most difficult questions facing society, and because of the great contributions he has made to the literary canon of Canada and British Columbia. 

His numerous books and his trail-blazing efforts in creating literary journals and a forum for public engagement – not least New Star Books and the Georgia Straight – have helped develop British Columbia’s literary community into what it is today.

From his earliest days in the “New American Poetry” community of San Francisco to his sojourn teaching philosophy at Capilano University in North Vancouver, Stan has cheerfully persisted in his role as literary colleague, mentor, guide, teacher and collaborator. From the real-world and digital versions of Toronto’s Dooney’s Cafe, and even from his part-time residence in Berlin, Stan has always taken British Columbia seriously. He has subjected British Columbia to thoughtful inquiry, and has held British Columbian literature to the highest standards.

Stan’s bravery as a philosopher, a polemicist and a story teller leap from the pages of his twenty books, from Lives of the French Symbolist Poets and Topic Sentence: A Writer‘s Education, and from At The Lenin Shipyard: Poland and the Rise of the Solidarity Trade Union to Fantasy Government: Bill Vander Zalm and the Future of Social Credit and Buddy’s: Meditations on Desire. His grace as an essayist, his curiosity and independence of thought as a critic and newspaper columnist, and his exuberance as a civil rights activist and a leading voice of the gay community, have enriched us all.

Stan Persky is our Socrates. British Columbians can rightly boast that he is truly one of ours.  We are enormously proud to offer him the recognition of the 2010 Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Literary Excellence.”

2010 Jury: Terry Glavin, 2009 recipient of the Lieutenant Governor’s Literary Award for Excellence; Lynne van Luven, Associate Dean, Faculty of Fine Arts, University of Victoria; Robert Wiersema, author and bookseller.