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2013 Finalists

The West Coast Book Prize Society is thrilled to announce the finalists for the 2013 BC Book Prizes. Congratulations to the authors, illustrators and publishers! The winners of the 2013 Lieutenant Governor's Award for Literary Excellence were announced at the BC Book Prizes Soirée on April 10.

Winners announced Saturday, May 4, 2013 | Government House, Victoria

 

Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize

Supported by Friesens and Webcom
Judges: Joy Gugeler, Theresa Kishkan, Andreas Schroeder

Winner! The World
by Bill Gaston
Publisher: Hamish Hamilton Canada, Penguin Group Canada

The World

A recently divorced, early retiree accidentally burns down his house on the day he pays off the mortgage, only to discover that he’s forgotten to pay his insurance premium. An old friend of his prepares for her suicide to end the pain of esophageal cancer. Her father ends his days in a Toronto facility for Alzheimer’s patients. The three are tied together by their bonds of affection and a book called The World, written by the old man in his youth. The book, possibly biographical, tells the story of a historian who unearths a cache of letters, written in Chinese, in an abandoned leper colony off the coast of Victoria. He and the young Chinese translator fall in love, only to betray each other in the cruellest way possible, each violating what the other reveres most. Bill Gaston is a Canadian novelist, short-story writer, and playwright. He teaches at the University of Victoria. More

Floating Like the Dead
by Yasuko Thanh
Publisher: McClelland & Stewart Ltd.

Floating Like the Dead

In a story set in 1960s Germany and crackling with sexual tension, a young woman on the verge of making a life-changing decision is sent to work as a homemaker for a farmer and his family while his wife is away. When his dying lover becomes convinced he is being visited by a ghost, a man is forced to confront his own fears about being left behind. In a Mexican resort town where anything goes, a woman searching for a place to belong pushes herself to the limits of love and despair. And in “Floating Like the Dead,” a group of Chinese lepers spend their last days dreaming of escape after they are exiled to a remote island off the coast of BC, at the turn of the twentieth century. Yasuko Thanh won the prestigious Writers’ Trust of Canada/McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize in 2009. She recently received her MFA from the University of Victoria. More

Gay Dwarves of America
by Anne Fleming
Publisher: Pedlar Press

Gay Dwarves of America

There are no gay dwarves in Gay Dwarves of America, but there’s a mother of a teen with dwarfism who worries he might be gay, and there’s a parasitologist named Edna who’d rather not hear the words ‘gay’ or ‘lesbian’ but longs for the love of a certain young woman, and a boy on a unicycle — there is always a boy on a unicycle — and a hockey mom in Toronto who pretends to be Swiss. Hut, hut, hut, she shouts in the stands, ringing her cowbell like she was at a ski hill. There’s a story that’s a musical (numbers include “You Can’t Leave a Man in a Coma” and “The Total Quality Management Waltz”) and a story that’s one family’s puke diary. Anne Fleming’s fiction has been commissioned by CBC Radio, and widely published in magazines and anthologies. She also writes poetry and children’s books, plus the occasional stage play and screenplay. More

Malarky
by Anakana Schofield
Publisher: Biblioasis

Malarky

Our Woman will not be sunk by what life’s about to serve her. She’s caught her son doing unmentionable things out by the barn. She’s been accosted by Red the Twit, who claims to have done things with Our Woman’s husband that could frankly have gone without mentioning. And now her son’s gone and joined the army, and Our Woman has found a young fella to do unmentionable things with herself, just so she might understand it all. Malarky is the story of an Irish mother forced to look grief in the eye, and of a wife come face-to-face with the mad agony of longing. Anakana Schofield is an Irish-Canadian writer of fiction, essays, and literary criticism. She contributes to the London Review of Books, The Recorder: The Journal of the American Irish Historical Society, The Globe & Mail and The Vancouver Sun. She resides in Vancouver. Malarky is her first novel. More

Psychology and Other Stories
by C.P. Boyko
Publisher: Biblioasis

Psychology and Other Stories

Psychologists are people we love to hate. At best, they’re compassionate detectives of the human soul, healers and diagnosticians, assessing the internal machinations that structure our lives and behavior. At worst, however, they’re smug, hyper-educated, bombastic, yappy, socially deaf, thrice-divorced and twice-separated spouse-swapping cat-torturing perverts. Plus, they’re all in this book. And so are their patients. C.P. Boyko’s Psychology and Other Stories is a brilliant study of mental illness, mental health, and the people who try to tell them apart. C.P. Boyko lives and writes in Victoria, BC. More

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Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize

Supported by AbeBooks, Victoria Bindery and First Choice Books
Judges: Brian Lynch, Mark Stanton, Sylvia Taylor

Winner! The Art of the Impossible: Dave Barrett and the NDP in Power, 1972-1975
by Geoff Meggs, Rod Mickleburgh
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

The Art of the Impossible: Dave Barrett and the NDP in Power, 1972-1975

From 1972-1975, Premier Dave Barrett and his team passed more legislation in a shorter time than any government before or since. A university or college student graduating today in BC may have been born years after Barrett’s defeat, but could attend a Barrett daycare, live on a farm in Barrett’s Agricultural Land Reserve, be rushed to hospital in a provincial ambulance created by Barrett’s government and attend college in a community institution founded by his government. The continuing polarization of BC politics also dates back to Barrett—the Fraser Institute and the right-wing economic policies it preaches are as much a legacy of the Barrett years as the ALR. Dave Barrett remains a unique and important figure in BC’s history, a symbol of how much can be achieved in government and a reminder of how quickly those achievements can be forgotten. Geoff Meggs is a Vancouver city councillor and a former communications director to Premier Glen Clark and Vancouver mayor Larry Campbell. Rod Mickleburgh is a senior writer for the Globe & Mail, based in Vancouver. More

Into the Abyss: How a Deadly Plane Crash Changed the Lives of a Pilot, a Politician, a Criminal and a Cop
by Carol Shaben
Publisher: Random House Canada

Into the Abyss: How a Deadly Plane Crash Changed the Lives of a Pilot, a Politician, a Criminal and a Cop

On an icy night in October 1984, a Piper Navajo commuter plane carrying 9 passengers crashed in the remote wilderness of northern Alberta, killing 6 people. Four survived: the rookie pilot, a prominent politician, a cop, and the criminal he was escorting to face charges. As they fought through the night to stay alive, the dividing lines of power, wealth and status were erased and each man was forced to confront the precious and limited nature of his existence. The survivors forged unlikely friendships and through them found strength and courage to rebuild their lives. Into the Abyss is a powerful narrative that combines in-depth reporting with sympathy and grace to explore how a single, tragic event can upset our assumptions and become a catalyst for transformation. Carol Shaben was nominated for 3 National Magazine Awards, including Best New Magazine Writer, and won 2 of them, a Gold Medal for Investigative Reporting and a Silver Medal for Politics and Public Interest. More

Journey with No Maps: A Life of P.K. Page
by Sandra Djwa
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press

Journey with No Maps: A Life of P.K. Page

Journey with No Maps is the first biography of P.K. Page, a brilliant twentieth-century poet and a fine artist. The product of over a decade’s research and writing, the book follows Page as she becomes one of Canada’s best-loved and most influential writers. “A borderline being,” as she called herself, she recognized the new choices offered to women by modern life but followed only those related to her quest for self-discovery. Tracing Page’s life through two wars, world travels, the rise of modernist and Canadian cultures, and later Sufi study, biographer Sandra Djwa details the people and events that inspired her work. Sandra Djwa is professor emeritus of English at Simon Fraser University, and the prize-winning author of The Politics of the Imagination: A Life of F.R. Scott and Professing English: A Life of Roy Daniells. More

The Light through the Trees: Reflections on Land and Farming
by Luanne Armstrong
Publisher: Caitlin Press

The Light through the Trees: Reflections on Land and Farming

The Light Through the Trees is a remarkable and deeply wise reflection on land, farming, a sense of place, connecting with nature and what it means to live on this earth. As a third-generation farmer, the author’s roots go deep into the land but her work also captures her thoughts on such current issues as the environment, environmental identity and animal ethics. Her writing is poetic, lyrical and engaging. Part farmer, part poet, part activist, Armstrong engages her readers through her fascination and close involvement with both the natural and the human worlds. Luanne Armstrong is a prize-winning author of numerous books which include writing about the environment and farming. She has written children’s books, poetry and novels. She teaches creative writing online for the UBC Master’s program. She lives on her organic farm on Kootenay Lake. More

Pinboy
by George Bowering
Publisher: Cormorant Books

Pinboy

As a teenager, legendary Canadian poet George Bowering lived the life of an ordinary boy. He loved baseball, read Westerns, held a part-time job, and fantasized about girls and women. George was due for a sexual awakening, which arrived when he was fifteen. But what took place was anything but ordinary when George found himself vying for the affections of three very different women: his first love, the girl from the wrong side of the tracks, and one of his high school teachers. Set in the South Okanagan Valley in the Fifties, Pinboy is an intimately honest and often hilarious memoir that skilfully captures the delirious chaos that takes place as a boy becomes a man. George Bowering was the first Parliamentary Poet Laureate of Canada. In 1993, he became an Officer of the Order of Canada, and in 2004 received the Order of British Columbia. More

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Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize

Supported by the BC Teachers’ Federation
Judges: Larissa Lai, Susan Musgrave, John Pass

Winner! Geographies of a Lover
by Sarah de Leeuw
Publisher: NeWest Press

Geographies of a Lover

Drawing inspiration from such works as Pauline Réage’s The Story of O and Marian Engel’s Bear, poet Sarah de Leeuw uses the varied landscape of Canada—from the forests of North Vancouver through the Rocky Mountains, the prairies, and all the way to the Maritimes—to map the highs and lows of an explicit and raw sexual journey, from earliest infatuation to insatiable obsession and beyond. Sarah de Leeuw is a human geographer. She has a PhD in historical-cultural geography, and is currently an Assistant Professor with the Northern Medical Program at UNBC, the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia. More

A Grain of Rice
by Evelyn Lau
Publisher: Oolichan Books

A Grain of Rice

A Grain of Rice includes a passionate suite of poems that pay tribute to John Updike’s life and work. Many of the poems in A Grain of Rice are haunted by the deaths of friends and family. They explore cultural history, stories in the news, travel and place — especially the relationship between home and our nomadic inclinations. In many respects the book is a meditation on loss. Grief and aging, family history, an attention to place; poems on local urban social issues; poems that seek and find their inspiration in Asian culture and literature — all form a tapestry of faces that simultaneously defy and embrace the inevitable and celebrate the transformational. Evelyn Lau’s work has appeared in over a hundred literary magazines, garnering four Western Magazine Awards and a National Magazine Award. She presently freelances as a mentor to aspiring writers through UBC’s booming Ground and SFU’s Writing and Publishing Program. More

IKMQ
by Roger Farr
Publisher: New Star Books

IKMQ

Roger Farr’s IKMQ consists of sixty-four brief passages – stories, descriptions, instructions, scenarios, formulae – each involving the characters represented by the letters I, K, M and Q. Various clues, suggested by the rules of grammar and syntax, hint at connections and continuities, and at narrative peaking out from behind the screen of action. But never mind the theory – enjoy the ride, as I, K, M and Q convert houses to commercial grow-ops, manufacture explosives, go all in on the flop, get up early to catch chinook, plan, build and sell subdivisions, conduct meetings according to Roberts, plot a prison break, score an all-important goal, get the door for the pizza delivery boy, and get on with transforming the world through their revolutionary action. Roger Farr is described as “a poet of great heart and aesthetic/political commitment.” He teaches in the Creative Writing and Culture and Technology Programs at Capilano University, Vancouver BC, and edits CUE Books. More

Night-Eater
by Patricia Young
Publisher: Quattro Books

Night-Eater

Sharp and strong as steel blades, these poems fuse eerie beauty with gleaming wit, and strangeness with tenderness. In showing the intersection of the mundane and the domestic with the uncouth and uncanny, the author lives up to such praise as “an artist … whose sensitivity to language is characteristic of the truly great in poetry” (R.W. Stedingh) and “Young moves in and out of time and worlds, never flagging or faltering and takes the reader with her” (Susan Musgrave). These are “poems to understand life by” (Rick Gibbs). Patricia Young has published ten collections of poetry. Her awards include the BC Book Prize, the CBC Literary Award, the Pat Lowther Award, Arc’s Poem of the Year Award, the Confederation Poets Prize and the Bliss Carman Award. Airstream, her collection of short fiction, received the Metcalf-Rooke Award and was listed as one of the Globe & Mail’s best books of the year. She lives in Victoria, BC. More

The Properties
by Colin Browne
Publisher: Talonbooks

The Properties

Poetry begins when the properties of things—and the correspondences among them—reveal themselves through language. Language is the veil that can pierce itself. The poems in The Properties record encounters between desire and the repressed or suppressed interstices of social, economic, political and unconscious forces. They’re alert to correspondences, attentive to the lines of force to which the poet’s family quietly assented in the contested place that is the Northwest Coast of North America. Colin Browne is a critically acclaimed poet, filmmaker, and professor at Simon Fraser University’s School for the Contemporary Arts. His recent work explores the Surrealist fascination with the art of the Northwest Coast. More

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Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize

Supported by Marquis
Judges: Sybil Harrison, Grant Lawrence, Sheryl MacKay

Winner! British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas
by Derek Hayes
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas

Over 900 maps tell the story of the planners, schemers, gold seekers and fur traders who built BC. When gold was discovered in quantity in 1858, leading to the gold rush that created BC, the interior of the province was mostly unknown except for the routes blazed by fur traders. Thirteen years later, BC became a province of Canada, and a transcontinental railway was built to connect the land west of the Rocky Mountains with the rest of the country. The efforts of these explorers, fur traders, gold seekers and railway builders involved the production of maps that showed what they had found and what they proposed to do—the plans and the strategies that created the province we know today. Master map historian Derek Hayes continues his renowned Historical Atlas Series with a richly rewarding treasure trove, bringing to light the dramatic history of BC. Derek Hayes, a geographer by training, has a passion for old maps and what they can reveal about the past. He lives in White Rock, BC. More

Bruno and the Beach: The Beachcombers at 40
by Jackson Davies, Marc Strange
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

Bruno and the Beach: The Beachcombers at 40

Bruno and the Beach is a lively, highly illustrated book celebrating the fortieth anniversary of Canada’s longest running dramatic TV production, The Beachcombers, which aired on CBC TV from 1972 to 1990. The remarkable saga of The Beachcombers would never have unfolded without the show’s larger-than-life star, Bruno Gerussi (Nick Adonidas). His passionate battles to keep the show on air for nearly twenty years were as dramatic as anything that occurred on camera. Groundbreaking for its First Nations content and notable for an outstanding supporting cast, The Beachcombers is a Canadian treasure that became famous around the world. Written by co-creator Marc Strange and series actor Jackson Davies (Constable John Constable), this book offers a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the lives of those who gathered at Molly’s Reach and shaped a national pastime. Jackson Davies is a Canadian actor who lives in Tsawwassen, BC. Marc Strange (1941-2012) was a Toronto-based writer and actor. More

Liquor, Lust, and the Law: The Story of Vancouver's Legendary Penthouse Nightclub
by Aaron Chapman
Publisher: Arsenal Pulp Press

Liquor, Lust, and the Law: The Story of Vancouver's Legendary Penthouse Nightclub

The Penthouse Nightclub was opened in 1947 by brothers Joe, Ross, Mickey, and Jimmy Filippone and soon became the place to see and be seen in Vancouver in the 1950s and ‘60s. Acts like Sammy Davis Jr and Nat King Cole regularly performed on the Penthouse stage, and audiences often included visiting stars such as Frank Sinatra and Gary Cooper. In the 1970s, the Penthouse became infamous for its exotic dancers, resulting in a colourful, lurid history involving vice squads, politicians, judges, and con men, and culminating in the murder of Joe Philliponi, known as the “Godfather of Seymour Street,” in 1983. However, through decades of evolving social mores and changing cultural styles in a city constantly trying to reinvent itself, the Penthouse has somehow survived, a testament to its storied history and the fortitude of the Filippone family that still owns it. Aaron Chapman is a writer, historian, and musician with a special interest in Vancouver’s entertainment history. More

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las: Jane Constance Cook and the Politics of Memory, Church, and Custom
by Leslie A. Robertson, Kwagu’l Gixsam Clan
Publisher: The University of British Columbia Press

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las: Jane Constance Cook and the Politics of Memory, Church, and Custom

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las is a compelling conversation with the colonial past initiated by the descendants of Kwakwaka’wakw leader and activist, Jane Constance Cook (1870-1951). Working in collaboration, Robertson and Cook’s descendants open this history, challenging dominant narratives that misrepresent her motivations for criticizing customary practices and eventually supporting the potlatch ban. They offer a nuanced portrait of a high-ranked woman who was a cultural mediator; devout Christian; and activist for land claims, fishing and resource rights, and adequate health care. Ga’axsta’las testified at the McKenna-McBride Royal Commission, was the only woman on the executive of the Allied Indian Tribes of BC, and was a fierce advocate for women and children. This powerful meditation on memory documents how the Kwagu’l Gixsam revived their dormant clan to forge a positive social and cultural identity for future generations through feasting and potlatching. Leslie A. Robertson is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at UBC. The Kwagu’l Gixsam Clan includes approximately one thousand members descended from a common ancestor. Their cultural root is Tsaxis (Fort Rupert). More

Undesirables: White Canada and the Komagata Maru - An Illustrated History
by Ali Kazimi
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Undesirables: White Canada and the Komagata Maru - An Illustrated History

In May 1914, the Komagata Maru, a ship carrying 376 immigrants from British India, was turned away when it tried to land in Vancouver harbour. Many of the men on board, veterans of the British Indian Army, believed it was their right to settle anywhere in the empire they had fought to defend. They were wrong. Enforcing the “continuous journey” regulation, immigration boats surrounded the ship a half-mile off shore, making the passengers virtual prisoners. Thus began a dramatic stand-off that would escalate over the next two months, becoming one of the most infamous events in Canadian history. Award-winning filmmaker Ali Kazimi creates a historical framework that allows readers to view events through the eyes of earlier South Asian migrants to Vancouver, authorities of the Dominion of Canada, and imperial officials in Britain and India. Ali Kazimi is a Toronto-based filmmaker. Born and raised in India, he came to Canada in 1983. Kazimi is an associate professor in the Department of Film at York University. More

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Sheila A. Egoff Children’s Literature Prize

Supported by the BC Library Association
Judges: Glen Huser, Sheryl McFarlane, Pam Withers

Winner! Middle of Nowhere
by Caroline Adderson
Publisher: Groundwood Books

Middle of Nowhere

When his mother doesn’t return from her all-night job at the local gas bar, Curtis must keep her absence a secret and look after himself and his five-year old brother, Artie. He knows exactly what will happen if any of the teachers find out the truth. He remembers his last foster home all too clearly. But when it all becomes too much for him to handle, Curtis and Artie befriend Mrs. Burt, the cranky, lonely old lady across the street. When the authorities start to investigate, Mrs. Burt and the boys abscond to her remote cabin by the lake. At the lake, the boys’ days are filled with wood-chopping, outhouse-building, fishing, swimming and Mrs. Burt’s wonderful cooking. But then the weather grows colder, and Mrs. Burt seems to be preparing to spend the winter at the cabin. Have they really all just absconded to the lake for a summer holiday? Or have the two boys been kidnapped? Caroline Adderson is the author of several award-winning books for adults and children. She lives in Vancouver, BC. More

Mimi Power and the I-Don’t-Know-What
by Victoria Miles
Publisher: Tradewind Books

Mimi Power and the I-Don’t-Know-What

Artist, animal lover and would-be swimming sensation Mimi Power knows what it’s like to live under the tyranny of a three-year-old sister. Things have never been the same in the Power house since “The Waby” arrived. Finding creative space in all the chaos is getting harder by the minute for Mimi. But with the school art show looming and a prize too-good-to-give-up-on at stake, Mimi comes up with a plan that’s three-year-old foolproof. Or is it? To know for sure, Mimi will have to tap into her big sister power and find her own little piece of the sky. Award-winning author Victoria Miles lives in North Vancouver, BC, with her husband, photographer David Nunuk, and two daughters—Emily and Daphne—otherwise known as Waby. More

The Prisoner of Snowflake Falls
by John Lekich
Publisher: Orca Book Publishers

The Prisoner of Snowflake Falls

Henry Holloway’s mother died when he was nine, leaving him to be raised by his Uncle Andy and his friends, all amiable small-time crooks. When Uncle Andy is sent to prison, Henry must escape the notice of Social Services. Fortunately, Henry possesses all the skills it takes to be a successful house burglar. Henry is an unusually resourceful and considerate burglar – until he’s caught. He is sent to live with the Wingates, a strange family in a small town called Snowflake Falls. Henry is just getting used to his temporary family when the newly liberated Uncle Andy and his criminal friends draw him into a plan to rob the citizens of Snowflake Falls. Will Henry be loyal to his uncle or will he break with the past and do the right thing? John Lekich is a Vancouver-based author and freelance writer whose work has appeared in such publications as Reader’s Digest, the Los Angeles Times and the Hollywood Reporter. More

The Reluctant Journal of Henry K. Larsen
by Susin Nielsen
Publisher: Tundra Books

The Reluctant Journal of Henry K. Larsen

Thirteen-year-old Henry’s ordinary life ends when his brother picks up their father’s hunting rifle and leaves the house before the family wakes up. What follows shatters their family, forcing them to resume their lives in Vancouver, where no one knows their past. When Henry’s therapist suggests he keep a journal, he resists, but soon confides in it at all hours. Henry eventually befriends a number of oddballs who help him navigate life after “IT.” Susin Nielsen got her start writing a spec script for Degrassi Junior High. She wrote 16 episodes and four Degrassi books. She also wrote award-winning novel Word Nerd and critically acclaimed Dear George Clooney, Please Marry My Mom. She lives in Vancouver, BC. More

Seraphina
by Rachel Hartman
Publisher: Doubleday Canada

Seraphina

Four decades of peace have done little to ease the mistrust between humans and dragons in the kingdom of Goredd. Folding themselves into human shape, dragons attend court as ambassadors, and lend their rational, mathematical minds to universities as scholars and teachers. As the treaty’s anniversary draws near, however, tensions are high. Seraphina has reason to fear both sides. An unusually gifted musician, she joins the court just as a member of the royal family is murdered. While a sinister plot to destroy the peace is uncovered, Seraphina struggles to protect the secret behind her musical gift, one so terrible that its discovery could mean her very life. Seraphina’s tortuous journey to self-acceptance will make a magical, indelible impression on its readers. Seraphina is Rachel Hartman‘s debut novel. She lives in Vancouver. More

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Christie Harris Illustrated Children’s Literature Prize

Supported by Ampersand Inc. and Kate Walker
Judges: Dianna Bonder, Marguerite Ruurs, Yukiko Tosa

Winner! Maggie’s Chopsticks
by Alan Woo
Illustrated by Isabelle Malenfant
Publisher: Kids Can Press

Maggie’s Chopsticks

Poor Maggie struggles to master her chopsticks — it seems nearly everyone around the dinner table has something to say about the “right” way to hold them! But when Father reminds her not to worry about everyone else, Maggie finally gets a grip on an important lesson. Alan Woo was born in England and grew up in Vancouver. His work has been published in RicePaper magazine and Quills Canadian Poetry Magazine. Isabelle Malenfant lives and works in Montréal with her family. She loves the creation of characters and sensitive stories, which are sometimes funny, sometimes dark. More

Gift Days
by Kari-Lynn Winters
Illustrated by Stephen Taylor
Publisher: Fitzhenry & Whiteside

Gift Days

Young Nassali longs to read and write like her brother, but since her mother’s death, Nassali is responsible for looking after her younger siblings and running the household. There is no time for books and learning. Then one day, she wakes up to discover that her chores have been taken care of. It is her first gift day. From that day on, once a week, her brother gives Nassali the gift of time so that she can pursue her dream of an education, just as her mother would have wanted. Kari-Lynn Winters is an author, poet, and performer. She is Assistant Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Brock University in St Catharines, Ontario, where she teaches drama-in- education. Stephen Taylor has illustrated numerous children’s books, including educational publishings over a span of 20 years. Taylor was born in Dulwich, England and currently resides in Toronto, Canada with his wife and son. More

Hey Canada!
by Vivien Bowers
Illustrated by Milan Pavlovic
Publisher: Tundra Books

Hey Canada!

Gran has decided that she is taking nine-year-old Alice and eight-year-old Cal on a road trip across Canada “before she’s old and creaky.” With a sparkling combination of poems, silly songs, tweets and blogs, the trio records the trip for readers everywhere to share. Starting in St. John’s Newfoundland, where they have a “find-it” list that includes a moose and an iceberg and going all the way to the Pacific Ocean, the gang in Hey Canada! offers a delightful way to learn about vast, varied, and surprising Canada. Vivien Bowers has been a freelance writer for more than twenty-five years, writing elementary and secondary school materials, as well as non-fiction books and magazine articles for both adults and children. Bowers has two grown sons and lives at the base of the mountains outside Nelson, BC. Milan Pavlovic is an illustrator, graphic artist and educator. He currently teaches at OCAD University and lives in Toronto with his family. More

Rainbow Shoes
by Tiffany Stone
Illustrated by Stefan Czernecki
Publisher: Tradewind Books

Rainbow Shoes

What to wear? What to choose? Pick a pair of rainbow shoes. Or purple pants from aunts in France that make you want to strut and prance. Pink pj’s for pirate naps with pockets to hide treasure maps. Red rubber boots, the robot kind. All these and more are clothes you’ll find in this colour-full book of wearable rhymes. Tiffany Stone wonders why nothing rhymes with orange. She is a children’s poet and the author of Floyd the Flamingo and his flock of friends and Baad Animals. Tiffany lives in Maple Ridge with her husband and three children. Stefan Czernecki can draw invisible zippers. He is an illustrator and author who has published more than thirty books for children. Stefan lives in Vancouver. More

What’s Up, Bear?: A Book About Opposites
by Frieda Wishinsky
Illustrated by Sean L. Moore
Publisher: Owlkids Books

What’s Up, Bear?: A Book About Opposites

Sophie can’t wait to see New York, while Bear would much rather they just stay home. Sophie loves speeding around in a taxi cab, but Bear wishes the driver would slow down. Up and down, stop and go, tall and short, and many more opposite pairs are illustrated using iconic New York experiences, buildings, and landmarks. Then, when Sophie spies a window full of new bears in a toy store, Bear begins to worry he is too plain and old to compete with all the city has to offer. He’s proven right temporarily when Sophie forgets him in the toy store, but a helpful young boy and his mother find Bear and return him to Sophie at her hotel. The reunion is a happy one, and Sophie and Bear realize they love each other — no matter where they are! Frieda Wishinsky has written many beloved and best-selling books for children. Originally from New York, she now lives in Toronto. Sean L. Moore has written and illustrated several books for children. He lives with his dog, Zeke, in Vancouver. More

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Bill Duthie Booksellers’ Choice Award

Supported by the BC Booksellers’ Association
Judged by members of the BC Booksellers' Association

Winner! Making Headlines: 100 Years of The Vancouver Sun
by Shelley Fralic, with research by Kate Bird
Publisher: The Vancouver Sun

Making Headlines: 100 Years of The Vancouver Sun

This book is a celebration of The Vancouver Sun‘s first 100 years. It tells the story of Vancouver and the world through the eyes of a newspaper. Decade by decade, it provides fascinating stories from the sinking of the Titanic (just two months after its first issue), through wars, riots, parades, Royal visits and the Olympic Games. Filled with stunning images shot by The Sun‘s award winning photographers, it celebrates all that the newspaper has been, all that it is and all that it will continue to be as The Sun continues to offer all of us that first draft of history. Shelley Fralic has worked at The Vancouver Sun since 1979. After stints as the paper’s assistant features editor, projects editor and assistant managing editor, she was appointed executive editor in 1999. In 2003, she decided to return to her first love, writing. Today, she pens a Vancouver Sun column on social issues, pop culture and modern-day life. More

British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas
by Derek Hayes
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas

Over 900 maps tell the story of the planners, schemers, gold seekers and fur traders who built BC. When gold was discovered in quantity in 1858, leading to the gold rush that created BC, the interior of the province was mostly unknown except for the routes blazed by fur traders. Thirteen years later, BC became a province of Canada, and a transcontinental railway was built to connect the land west of the Rocky Mountains with the rest of the country. The efforts of these explorers, fur traders, gold seekers and railway builders involved the production of maps that showed what they had found and what they proposed to do—the plans and the strategies that created the province we know today. Master map historian Derek Hayes continues his renowned Historical Atlas Series with a richly rewarding treasure trove, bringing to light the dramatic history of BC. Derek Hayes, a geographer by training, has a passion for old maps and what they can reveal about the past. He lives in White Rock, BC. More

Bruno and the Beach: The Beachcombers at 40
by Jackson Davies, Marc Strange
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

Bruno and the Beach: The Beachcombers at 40

Bruno and the Beach is a lively, highly illustrated book celebrating the fortieth anniversary of Canada’s longest running dramatic TV production, The Beachcombers, which aired on CBC TV from 1972 to 1990. The remarkable saga of The Beachcombers would never have unfolded without the show’s larger-than-life star, Bruno Gerussi (Nick Adonidas). His passionate battles to keep the show on air for nearly twenty years were as dramatic as anything that occurred on camera. Groundbreaking for its First Nations content and notable for an outstanding supporting cast, The Beachcombers is a Canadian treasure that became famous around the world. Written by co-creator Marc Strange and series actor Jackson Davies (Constable John Constable), this book offers a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the lives of those who gathered at Molly’s Reach and shaped a national pastime. Jackson Davies is a Canadian actor who lives in Tsawwassen, BC. Marc Strange (1941-2012) was a Toronto-based writer and actor. More

Exploring Vancouver: The Architectural Guide
by Harold Kalman, Robin Ward
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

Exploring Vancouver: The Architectural Guide

Vancouver is still a young city, and its streetscapes and neighbourhoods reflect the city’s constant state of reinvention. New buildings adapt the latest global architectural trends to the regional context or express the distinct local West Coast style; heritage buildings stand for earlier eras and continuity. The result is a dynamic urban landscape. Exploring Vancouver is the definitive guide to the city’s architecture—from the breathtaking to the bizarre. Harold Kalman and Robin Ward take the reader on a walking or driving tour of 14 areas in and around the city and detail more than 450 of the city’s most notable buildings, structures and landscapes situating each in its social, cultural and historical context. Harold Kalman is a specialist in architectural history and heritage conservation. He is the author (or co-author) of many standard texts on architecture and conservation. Robin Ward is an architectural critic, writer and graphic artist. For more than 10 years, he wrote a weekly column on architecture for the Vancouver Sun. More

Trucking in British Columbia: An Illustrated History
by Daniel Francis
Publisher: Harbour Publishing

Trucking in British Columbia: An Illustrated History

Accompanied by hundreds of previously unpublished archival and contemporary photographs, award-winning historian Daniel Francis delivers a fascinating account of the last hundred years of trucking in BC. Beginning in Vancouver with James Stark’s first delivery van in 1907, motorized transport exploded in the province, soon traversing every dirt track, hauling logs on temporary plank roads and leading to a frenzy of experimentation and innovation—from the failed Renard Road Train and early battery-operated vehicles to some truly impressive purpose-built trucks, many of them manufactured in BC. From hair-raising tales of the road by trucking legends like the scholarly Andy Craig and the bombastic Cog Harrington to important infrastructure projects and vital innovations for the future, here is a story never told before, but an important and an exciting chapter in British Columbia’s history. Daniel Francis is a historian and author of over twenty books. He is a columnist and editorial board member to Geist and lives in North Vancouver, BC. More

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Lieutenant Governor's Award for Literary Excellence

2013 Jury: Brian Brett, author and 2012 recipient of the Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Literary Excellence; Lynn Copeland, former Dean of Library Services at Simon Fraser University; and, Alma Lee, founder of the Vancouver International Writers and Readers Festival.

Winner! Lorna Crozier

Lorna Crozier

“Lorna Crozier is a memoirist, professor, Officer of the Order of Canada, and Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. But first she is one of the finest poets writing today. Her poetry is praised for its ‘felicity of language, depth of feeling and compassionate and compelling vision.’ (Canadian Literature) She ‘glimpses the mystery of light at the heart of being.’ (Books in Canada)” – jury

Lorna Crozier has published 17 books of poetry, most recently The Book of Marvels: A Compendium of Everyday Things, named as one of The Globe’s Top 100 Books of 2012 and nominated for this year’s Pat Lowther Award for the best book of poetry by a Canadian woman. She has won this award twice before and has been the recipient of most of this country’s major literary prizes, including the Governor General’s Award, the Canadian Authors’ Association Award, the National Magazine’s Gold Medal for Poetry, the CBC national writing competition, and the 2009 Hubert Evan’s Award for BC’s best book of nonfiction for her memoir, Small Beneath the Sky. She was also named an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2011 and was recognized as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2009.

Beyond the writing awards, Lorna has been honoured for great distinction in both teaching and scholarly research in the academic community, receiving the University of Victoria’s 2004 Distinguished Professor’s Award. For her contribution to Canadian literature, she has received three honorary doctorates.

Since the beginning of her writing career, Lorna has been known for her inspired teaching and mentoring of other poets. Since 1991 she has been a beloved teacher of writing at the University of Victoria. She’s read for Queen Elizabeth and has performed her poems on every continent except Antarctica. In addition to selections of her work appearing in such languages as Chinese, Serbian, Italian and Portugese, a book of her poems in Spanish was published by a press in Mexico City.  Another of her books was translated into French and published by Vermillon Press in Ottawa.

Her reputation as a generous and inspiring artist extends from her passion for the craft of poetry to her teaching and through to her involvement in various social causes. In addition to leading poetry workshops across the globe, Lorna has given benefit readings for numerous organizations such as the SPCA, the BC Land Conservancy, the Victoria READ Society, and PEERS, a group committed to helping prostitutes get off the street. A regular contributor to CBC radio, in 2011 she hosted a special edition on poverty for the show, “The Current.”

Margaret Laurence called her “a poet to be grateful for.” Books in Canada claimed “she is one of the most original poets writing in English today.” The Ottawa Citizen described her as “One of Canada’s most read and most honoured poets….[Crozier’s poems] become part of the reader’s permanent memory.” Of her selected poems, Ursula Le Guin wrote in The New York Times Book Review, “What a joy to have a volume of selected poems by this marvellous Canadian poet, storyteller, truth-teller, visionary.” Of her memoir, Sharon Butala wrote. “I found it deeply touching,” and the reviewer of her most recent collection, The Book of Marvels, in The Globe and Mail said that after reading this book, “From here on in, it will be impossible to be bored or take anything for granted ever again. And for that, we can ever be grateful to Lorna Crozier.”

More information about Lorna Crozier can be found on her website.

Winner! Sarah Ellis

Sarah Ellis

“Sarah Ellis is one of the most illustrious and admired writers for children in Canada today. Her stories and novels are loved by young adults for their wit, intelligence, compassion, and generosity of spirit – characteristics she brings to interpersonal relationships whether in small groups or in her frequent public addresses. …  (a) tireless contributor to the advocacy of the importance of children’s literature in Canada and internationally.” – jury

Born in Vancouver in 1952, Sarah Ellis is one of the most illustrious and admired writers for children in Canada today. As a child, she attended school in Vancouver and went on to study English and Library Studies at UBC, earning her Master’s Degree there. She continued her studies at Simmons College in Boston where she studied at the Center for the Study of Children’s Literature. She became a librarian at the Toronto Public Library, then the Vancouver Public Library and the North Vancouver District Library. During her many years as a librarian she developed her storytelling skills and puppetry. She now writes reviews and is a sought-after lecturer nationally and internationally on writing and on Canadian Children’s books.

Among her many awards, she received the first Sheila A. Egoff Award in 1987 for her first book, The Baby Project. She also won the Sheila A. Egoff Award in 1997 and again in 2007. She won the 1991 Governor General’s Award for children’s Literature for her novel, Pick-up Sticks. Out of the Blue won the IODE Violet Downey Book Award and the Mr. Christie Book Award. In 1995, she was awarded the Vicky Metcalf Award for a Body of Work and in 1999, she was asked to be the first Writer-in-Residence children’s author at Massey College at the University of Toronto. She was also a finalist for the Norma Fleck Award for her non-fiction book, The Young Writer’s Companion. In 2007, Sarah won the $20,000 TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award for her novel, Odd Man Out. In 2012, she was the writer-in-residence at the Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books in Toronto. This year she was one of two Canadian nominees for the international book prize, The Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award.

Sarah has served on numerous boards and juries, internationally and locally, which include serving on the board of the Canadian Children’s Book Centre and Children’s Literature New England (current), as well as serving on juries for the Governor General’s Literary Awards, the Burt Award for Young Adult Literature, and various provincial book awards. Sarah also writes a book review column for Quill and Quire magazine and is a regular reviewer for The Hornbook.

Currently, Sarah travels widely, giving lectures on writing and children’s literature. She also teaches writing in a distance-education Master’s Degree program with Vermont College of Fine Arts while continuing to pursue her own writing in her home in Vancouver.

More information about Sarah Ellis can be found on her website.